3 added 14 characters in body
source | link

I don't know how Biblical figure names are handled in general but regarding names you can not change it easily without destroying potential meaning. You can not omit any words nor you can change word order. So usually you keep the name as is "Johannes der Nazarener". In this case the article emphasizes the fact Johannes is a real Nazarener standing for his religion.

Also in English you might not change the order of such a name: "Paul the carpenter" in any text. In rare cases you might say "The carpenter Paul", but this already has subtle different meaning and might be understood different.

"Johannes der Nazarener" is a fixed name or a literature figure. So if you change word ordering it is not clear you mean this one and only. However if you really don't mind, in German at least all these are syntactically valid:

Johannes der Nazarener ging in den Wald.

Johannes, der Nazarener, ging in den Wald.

Der Johannes, der Nazarener, ging in den Wald.

Der Nazarener Johannes ging in den Wald.

I don't know how Biblical figure names are handled in general but regarding names you can not change it easily without destroying potential meaning. You can not omit any words nor you can change word order. So usually you keep the name as is "Johannes der Nazarener". In this case the article emphasizes the fact Johannes is a real Nazarener standing for his religion.

Also in English you might not change the order of such a name: "Paul the carpenter" in any text. In rare cases you might say "The carpenter Paul", but this already has subtle different meaning and might be understood different.

"Johannes der Nazarener" is a fixed name or a literature figure. So if you change word ordering it is not clear you mean this one and only. However if you really don't mind, in German at least all these are valid:

Johannes der Nazarener ging in den Wald.

Johannes, der Nazarener, ging in den Wald.

Der Johannes, der Nazarener, ging in den Wald.

Der Nazarener Johannes ging in den Wald.

I don't know how Biblical figure names are handled in general but regarding names you can not change it easily without destroying potential meaning. You can not omit any words nor you can change word order. So usually you keep the name as is "Johannes der Nazarener". In this case the article emphasizes the fact Johannes is a real Nazarener standing for his religion.

Also in English you might not change the order of such a name: "Paul the carpenter" in any text. In rare cases you might say "The carpenter Paul", but this already has subtle different meaning and might be understood different.

"Johannes der Nazarener" is a fixed name or a literature figure. So if you change word ordering it is not clear you mean this one and only. However if you really don't mind, in German at least all these are syntactically valid:

Johannes der Nazarener ging in den Wald.

Johannes, der Nazarener, ging in den Wald.

Der Johannes, der Nazarener, ging in den Wald.

Der Nazarener Johannes ging in den Wald.

2 improved by comments
source | link

I don't know how Biblical figure names are handled in general but regarding names you can not change it easily without destroying potential meaning. You can not omit any words nor you can change word order. So usually you keep the name as is "Johannes der Nazarener". In this case the article emphasizes the fact Johannes is a real Nazarener standing for his religion.

Also in English you might not change the order of such a name: "Paul the carpenter" in any text. In rare cases you might say "The carpenter Paul", but this already has subtle different meaning and might be understood different.

"Johannes der Nazarener" is a fixed name or a literature figure. So if you change word ordering it is not clear you mean this one and only. However if you really don't mind, in German at least all these are valid:

Johannes der Nazarener ging in den Wald.

Johannes, der Nazarener, ging in den Wald.

Der Johannes, der Nazarener, ging in den Wald.

Der Nazarener Johannes ging in den Wald.

I don't know how Biblical figure names are handled in general but regarding names you can not change it easily without destroying potential meaning. You can not omit any words nor you can change word order. So usually you keep the name as is "Johannes der Nazarener". In this case the article emphasizes the fact Johannes is a real Nazarener standing for his religion.

Also in English you might not change the order of such a name: "Paul the carpenter" in any text. In rare cases you might say "The carpenter Paul", but this already has subtle different meaning and might be understood different.

I don't know how Biblical figure names are handled in general but regarding names you can not change it easily without destroying potential meaning. You can not omit any words nor you can change word order. So usually you keep the name as is "Johannes der Nazarener". In this case the article emphasizes the fact Johannes is a real Nazarener standing for his religion.

Also in English you might not change the order of such a name: "Paul the carpenter" in any text. In rare cases you might say "The carpenter Paul", but this already has subtle different meaning and might be understood different.

"Johannes der Nazarener" is a fixed name or a literature figure. So if you change word ordering it is not clear you mean this one and only. However if you really don't mind, in German at least all these are valid:

Johannes der Nazarener ging in den Wald.

Johannes, der Nazarener, ging in den Wald.

Der Johannes, der Nazarener, ging in den Wald.

Der Nazarener Johannes ging in den Wald.

1
source | link

I don't know how Biblical figure names are handled in general but regarding names you can not change it easily without destroying potential meaning. You can not omit any words nor you can change word order. So usually you keep the name as is "Johannes der Nazarener". In this case the article emphasizes the fact Johannes is a real Nazarener standing for his religion.

Also in English you might not change the order of such a name: "Paul the carpenter" in any text. In rare cases you might say "The carpenter Paul", but this already has subtle different meaning and might be understood different.