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Among many other changes, the German Orthographic Conference of 1901 (a more detailed article is available in German Wikipedia) allowed to spell many words with K or Z which was written with C before, depending on their pronunciation. In most cases the version with C still stayed a valid version:

  • C → Z

    central → zentral
    social → sozial
    civil → zivil
    Centimeter → Zentimeter
    Citrone → Zitrone

  • C → K

    Compagnie → Kompanie
    Redacteur → Redakteur
    Conto → Konto
    Corpus → Korpus
    Cöln → Köln

  • both changes in one word

    Accent → Akzent
    Circus → Zirkus
    Concept → Konzept
    Concert → Konzert

The versions with c was used less frequent in the next decades, and today in most of all cases the version with c is no longer valid.

 

I have no evidence for this specific word, but I am very sure, that in 1901 they also changed

coliren → kolieren

(the change of ending -iren to -ieren was another change from 1901)

Im PharmaWiki you find a description of this word. It says:

kolieren = durch ein Tuch filtern

Wissen.de says:

kolieren = durch ein Tuch seihen

Both explanations translate to

to filter through a cloth

I think that seihen is the better matching synonym. Both verbs (filtern, seihen) translate to to filter in english, but when you use filtern then the pores of the filter are so small, that you can't see them with naked eye. When you use seihen or kolieren then the pores of the filter are much bigger. They are so big, that you can see them with your naked eye.


Etymology

The word kolieren, coliren has its origin in the latin word

colare = to filter, to sieve

Among many other changes, the German Orthographic Conference of 1901 (a more detailed article is available in German Wikipedia) allowed to spell many words with K or Z which was written with C before, depending on their pronunciation. In most cases the version with C still stayed a valid version:

  • C → Z

    central → zentral
    social → sozial
    civil → zivil
    Centimeter → Zentimeter
    Citrone → Zitrone

  • C → K

    Compagnie → Kompanie
    Redacteur → Redakteur
    Conto → Konto
    Corpus → Korpus
    Cöln → Köln

  • both changes in one word

    Accent → Akzent
    Circus → Zirkus
    Concept → Konzept
    Concert → Konzert

The versions with c was used less frequent in the next decades, and today in most of all cases the version with c is no longer valid.

I have no evidence for this specific word, but I am very sure, that in 1901 they also changed

coliren → kolieren

(the change of ending -iren to -ieren was another change from 1901)

Im PharmaWiki you find a description of this word. It says:

kolieren = durch ein Tuch filtern

Wissen.de says:

kolieren = durch ein Tuch seihen

Both explanations translate to

to filter through a cloth

I think that seihen is the better matching synonym. Both verbs (filtern, seihen) translate to to filter in english, but when you use filtern then the pores of the filter are so small, that you can't see them with naked eye. When you use seihen or kolieren then the pores of the filter are much bigger. They are so big, that you can see them with your naked eye.

Among many other changes, the German Orthographic Conference of 1901 (a more detailed article is available in German Wikipedia) allowed to spell many words with K or Z which was written with C before, depending on their pronunciation. In most cases the version with C still stayed a valid version:

  • C → Z

    central → zentral
    social → sozial
    civil → zivil
    Centimeter → Zentimeter
    Citrone → Zitrone

  • C → K

    Compagnie → Kompanie
    Redacteur → Redakteur
    Conto → Konto
    Corpus → Korpus
    Cöln → Köln

  • both changes in one word

    Accent → Akzent
    Circus → Zirkus
    Concept → Konzept
    Concert → Konzert

The versions with c was used less frequent in the next decades, and today in most of all cases the version with c is no longer valid.

 

I have no evidence for this specific word, but I am very sure, that in 1901 they also changed

coliren → kolieren

(the change of ending -iren to -ieren was another change from 1901)

Im PharmaWiki you find a description of this word. It says:

kolieren = durch ein Tuch filtern

Wissen.de says:

kolieren = durch ein Tuch seihen

Both explanations translate to

to filter through a cloth

I think that seihen is the better matching synonym. Both verbs (filtern, seihen) translate to to filter in english, but when you use filtern then the pores of the filter are so small, that you can't see them with naked eye. When you use seihen or kolieren then the pores of the filter are much bigger. They are so big, that you can see them with your naked eye.


Etymology

The word kolieren, coliren has its origin in the latin word

colare = to filter, to sieve

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source | link

Among many other changes, the German Orthographic Conference of 1901 (a more detailed article is available in German Wikipedia) allowed to spell many words with K or Z which was written with C before, depending on their pronunciation. In most cases the version with C still stayed a valid version:

  • C → Z

    central → zentral
    social → sozial
    civil → zivil
    Centimeter → Zentimeter
    Citrone → Zitrone

  • C → K

    Compagnie → Kompanie
    Redacteur → Redakteur
    Conto → Konto
    Corpus → Korpus
    Cöln → Köln

  • both changes in one word

    Accent → Akzent
    Circus → Zirkus
    Concept → Konzept
    Concert → Konzert

The versions with c was used less frequent in the next decades, and today in most of all cases the version with c is no longer valid.

I have no evidence for this specific word, but I am very sure, that in 1901 they also changed

coliren → kolieren

(the change of ending -iren to -ieren was another change from 1901)

Im PharmaWiki you find a description of this word. It says:

kolieren = durch ein Tuch filtern

Wissen.de says:

kolieren = durch ein Tuch seihen

Both explanations translate to

to filter through a cloth

I think that seihen is the better matching synonym. Both verbs (filtern, seihen) translate to to filter in english, but when you use filtern then the pores of the filter are so small, that you can't see them with naked eye. When you use seihen or kolieren then the pores of the filter are much bigger. They are so big, that you can see them with your naked eye.