I believe long sentences like these might read better as "one in a paragraph". Internet, you know. Or explain, example, resume.
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Shegit Brahm
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These kinds of adverbs in German add subtle nuances -- it is particularly recent that his job was guaranteed; hence his leaving now is surprising. English does this not with words, but with intonation. 

Think of a sentence like this: "Last week he was being considered for a promotion, and this week he's out the door." The surprise is not in the words or the grammar; it's in the intonation that we all know to put in when we read it -- the clue being the last week/this week contrast. 

So translating these German adverbs is not a matter of finding words for them, it's a matter of recognizing the affect that they impart to a statement and reproducing that affect by English means -- by choosing a word order, a sentence structure, etc. that imposes a certain intonation.

These kinds of adverbs in German add subtle nuances -- it is particularly recent that his job was guaranteed; hence his leaving now is surprising. English does this not with words, but with intonation. Think of a sentence like this: "Last week he was being considered for a promotion, and this week he's out the door." The surprise is not in the words or the grammar; it's in the intonation that we all know to put in when we read it -- the clue being the last week/this week contrast. So translating these German adverbs is not a matter of finding words for them, it's a matter of recognizing the affect that they impart to a statement and reproducing that affect by English means -- by choosing a word order, a sentence structure, etc. that imposes a certain intonation.

These kinds of adverbs in German add subtle nuances -- it is particularly recent that his job was guaranteed; hence his leaving now is surprising. English does this not with words, but with intonation. 

Think of a sentence like this: "Last week he was being considered for a promotion, and this week he's out the door." The surprise is not in the words or the grammar; it's in the intonation that we all know to put in when we read it -- the clue being the last week/this week contrast. 

So translating these German adverbs is not a matter of finding words for them, it's a matter of recognizing the affect that they impart to a statement and reproducing that affect by English means -- by choosing a word order, a sentence structure, etc. that imposes a certain intonation.

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Sym
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These kinds of adverbs in German add subtle nuances -- it is particularly recent that his job was guaranteed; hence his leaving now is surprising. English does this not with words, but with intonation. Think of a sentence like this: "Last week he was being considered for a promotion, and this week he's out the door." The surprise is not in the words or the grammar; it's in the intonation that we all know to put in when we read it -- the clue being the last week/this week contrast. So translating these German adverbs is not a matter of finding words for them, it's a matter of recognizing the affect that they impart to a statement and reproducing that affect by English means -- by choosing a word order, a sentence structure, etc. that imposes a certain intonation.