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/fʁoˈbeːniʊs/ (primary stress on the second syllable)

The r is more fricative, although a slightly rolling /ʀ/ is appropriate for more articulate pronunciation (e.g. when speaking in front of a larger audience without PA system). However, in some rural regions in the northwest, in the south of Germany as well as in Austria and Switzerland, natives will roll it stronger, like /ʀ/ or even /r/.

/ˈfɛʁdinant ˈgeːɔʁk fʁoˈbeːniʊs/

(In Ferdinand, the r is often slurred away completely, making it /ˈfɛɐ̯dinant/. Some people will pronounce the first syllable more like /feːɐ̯/.)

(See See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_IPA-Zeichen#R )

/fʁoˈbeːniʊs/ (primary stress on the second syllable)

The r is more fricative, although a slightly rolling /ʀ/ is appropriate for more articulate pronunciation (e.g. when speaking in front of a larger audience without PA system). However, in some rural regions in the northwest, in the south of Germany as well as in Austria and Switzerland, natives will roll it stronger, like /ʀ/ or even /r/.

/ˈfɛʁdinant ˈgeːɔʁk fʁoˈbeːniʊs/

(In Ferdinand, the r is often slurred away completely, making it /ˈfɛɐ̯dinant/. Some people will pronounce the first syllable more like /feːɐ̯/.)

(See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_IPA-Zeichen#R )

/fʁoˈbeːniʊs/ (primary stress on the second syllable)

The r is more fricative, although a slightly rolling /ʀ/ is appropriate for more articulate pronunciation (e.g. when speaking in front of a larger audience without PA system). However, in some rural regions in the northwest, in the south of Germany as well as in Austria and Switzerland, natives will roll it stronger, like /ʀ/ or even /r/.

/ˈfɛʁdinant ˈgeːɔʁk fʁoˈbeːniʊs/

(In Ferdinand, the r is often slurred away completely, making it /ˈfɛɐ̯dinant/. Some people will pronounce the first syllable more like /feːɐ̯/.)

( See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_IPA-Zeichen#R )

8 IPA + editor problems
source | link

/fʁoˈbeːniʊs/ (primary stress on the second syllable)

The r is more fricative, although a slightly rolling /ʀ/ is appropriate for more articulate pronunciation (e.g. when speaking in front of a larger audience without PA system). However, in some rural regions in the northwest, in the south of Germany as well as in Austria and Switzerland, natives will roll it stronger, like /ʀ/ or even /r/.

/ˈfɛʁdinant ˈgeːɔʁk fʁoˈbeːniʊs/

(In FerdinandFerdinand, the rr is often slurred away completely, making it /ˈfɛːɐ̯dinantˈfɛɐ̯dinant/. Some peoplepeople will pronounce the first syllable more like /feːɐ̯/.)

(See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_IPA-Zeichen#R )

/fʁoˈbeːniʊs/ (primary stress on the second syllable)

The r is more fricative, although a slightly rolling /ʀ/ is appropriate for more articulate pronunciation (e.g. when speaking in front of a larger audience without PA system). However, in some rural regions in the northwest, in the south of Germany as well as in Austria and Switzerland, natives will roll it stronger, like /ʀ/ or even /r/.

/ˈfɛʁdinant ˈgeːɔʁk fʁoˈbeːniʊs/

(In Ferdinand, the r is often slurred away completely, making it /ˈfɛːɐ̯dinant/. Some people will pronounce the first syllable more like /feːɐ̯/.)

(See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_IPA-Zeichen#R )

/fʁoˈbeːniʊs/ (primary stress on the second syllable)

The r is more fricative, although a slightly rolling /ʀ/ is appropriate for more articulate pronunciation (e.g. when speaking in front of a larger audience without PA system). However, in some rural regions in the northwest, in the south of Germany as well as in Austria and Switzerland, natives will roll it stronger, like /ʀ/ or even /r/.

/ˈfɛʁdinant ˈgeːɔʁk fʁoˈbeːniʊs/

(In Ferdinand, the r is often slurred away completely, making it /ˈfɛɐ̯dinant/. Some people will pronounce the first syllable more like /feːɐ̯/.)

(See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_IPA-Zeichen#R )

7 ɐ back to ɐ̯
source | link

/fʁoˈbeːniʊs/ (primary stress on the second syllable)

The r is more fricative, although a slightly rolling /ʀ/ is appropriate for more articulate pronunciation (e.g. when speaking in front of a larger audience without PA system). However, in some rural regions in the northwest, in the south of Germany as well as in Austria and Switzerland, natives will roll it stronger, like /ʀ/ or even /r/.

/ˈfɛʁdinant ˈgeːɔʁk fʁoˈbeːniʊs/

(In Ferdinand, the r is often slurred away completely, making it /ˈfɛːɐdinantˈfɛːɐ̯dinant/. Some people will pronounce the first syllable more like /feːɐfeːɐ̯/.)

(See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_IPA-Zeichen#R )

/fʁoˈbeːniʊs/ (primary stress on the second syllable)

The r is more fricative, although a slightly rolling /ʀ/ is appropriate for more articulate pronunciation (e.g. when speaking in front of a larger audience without PA system). However, in some rural regions in the northwest, in the south of Germany as well as in Austria and Switzerland, natives will roll it stronger, like /ʀ/ or even /r/.

/ˈfɛʁdinant ˈgeːɔʁk fʁoˈbeːniʊs/

(In Ferdinand, the r is often slurred away completely, making it /ˈfɛːɐdinant/. Some people will pronounce the first syllable more like /feːɐ/.)

(See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_IPA-Zeichen#R )

/fʁoˈbeːniʊs/ (primary stress on the second syllable)

The r is more fricative, although a slightly rolling /ʀ/ is appropriate for more articulate pronunciation (e.g. when speaking in front of a larger audience without PA system). However, in some rural regions in the northwest, in the south of Germany as well as in Austria and Switzerland, natives will roll it stronger, like /ʀ/ or even /r/.

/ˈfɛʁdinant ˈgeːɔʁk fʁoˈbeːniʊs/

(In Ferdinand, the r is often slurred away completely, making it /ˈfɛːɐ̯dinant/. Some people will pronounce the first syllable more like /feːɐ̯/.)

(See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_IPA-Zeichen#R )

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