Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
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First, you will always have the bonus of being a foreigner if your used nuances of words or phrases don't perfectly fit, because it always depends on the situation (level of education, reservation, familiarity, region you are from, …), and that is a very complex topic. But the things you learn in school are a best-fit for most situations.

How different are Spoken and Written German? Should they be learnt bearing these differences in mind?

Written German sounds a bit stilted for certain phrases, as in English as well; e.g. you wouldn't reply to your neighbour "... with regards to your question ...", or "I am going to" but "I'm gonna" instead.

Does using Präteritum ... by speaking sound strange?

Yes, rather say "I"Ich habe gesehen" instead of "I"Ich sah" because the latter is usually perceived like the examples I mentioned above.

If the answer to the first question is "yes", then: which other characteristics are typically "written German".

Written German uses more official phrases in letters (e.g. Bezugnehmend auf), or poetic phrases in books (e.g. erwidern). Too much to be listed here.

First, you will always have the bonus of being a foreigner if your used nuances of words or phrases don't perfectly fit, because it always depends on the situation (level of education, reservation, familiarity, region you are from, …), and that is a very complex topic. But the things you learn in school are a best-fit for most situations.

How different are Spoken and Written German? Should they be learnt bearing these differences in mind?

Written German sounds a bit stilted for certain phrases, as in English as well; e.g. you wouldn't reply to your neighbour "... with regards to your question ...", or "I am going to" but "I'm gonna" instead.

Does using Präteritum ... by speaking sound strange?

Yes, rather say "I habe gesehen" instead of "I sah" because the latter is usually perceived like the examples I mentioned above.

If the answer to the first question is "yes", then: which other characteristics are typically "written German".

Written German uses more official phrases in letters (e.g. Bezugnehmend auf), or poetic phrases in books (e.g. erwidern). Too much to be listed here.

First, you will always have the bonus of being a foreigner if your used nuances of words or phrases don't perfectly fit, because it always depends on the situation (level of education, reservation, familiarity, region you are from, …), and that is a very complex topic. But the things you learn in school are a best-fit for most situations.

How different are Spoken and Written German? Should they be learnt bearing these differences in mind?

Written German sounds a bit stilted for certain phrases, as in English as well; e.g. you wouldn't reply to your neighbour "... with regards to your question ...", or "I am going to" but "I'm gonna" instead.

Does using Präteritum ... by speaking sound strange?

Yes, rather say "Ich habe gesehen" instead of "Ich sah" because the latter is usually perceived like the examples I mentioned above.

If the answer to the first question is "yes", then: which other characteristics are typically "written German".

Written German uses more official phrases in letters (e.g. Bezugnehmend auf), or poetic phrases in books (e.g. erwidern). Too much to be listed here.

2 Spelling/language fixes
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First, you will always have the bonus of being a foreigner if your used nuances of words or phrases don't perfectly fit, because it always depends on the situation (level of education, reservation, familiarity, region you are from, ...), and that is a very complex topic. But the things you learn in school are a best-fit for most situations.

How different are Spoken and Written German? Should they be learnt bearing these differences in mind?

Written German sounds a bit stilted for certain phrases, as in English as well; e.g. you wouldn't reply to your neighbour "... with regards to your question ...", or "I am going to" but "I'm gonna" instead.

Does using Präteritum ... by speaking sound strange?

Yes, rather say "I habe gesehen" instead of "I sah" because the latter is usually perceived like the examples I mentioned above.

If the answer to the first question is "yes", then: which other characteristics are typically "written German".

Written German uses more official phrases in letters (e.g. Bezugnehmend auf), or poetic phrases in books (e.g. erwiedernerwidern). Too much to be listed here.

First, you will always have the bonus of being a foreigner if your used nuances of words or phrases don't perfectly fit, because it always depends on the situation (level of education, reservation, familiarity, region you are, ...), and that is a very complex topic. But the things you learn in school are a best-fit for most situations.

How different are Spoken and Written German? Should they be learnt bearing these differences in mind?

Written German sounds a bit stilted for certain phrases, as in English as well; e.g. you wouldn't reply to your neighbour "... with regards to your question ...", or "I am going to" but "I'm gonna" instead.

Does using Präteritum ... by speaking sound strange?

Yes, rather say "I habe gesehen" instead of "I sah" because the latter is usually perceived like the examples I mentioned above.

If the answer to the first question is "yes", then: which other characteristics are typically "written German".

Written German uses more official phrases in letters (e.g. Bezugnehmend auf), or poetic phrases in books (e.g. erwiedern). Too much to be listed here.

First, you will always have the bonus of being a foreigner if your used nuances of words or phrases don't perfectly fit, because it always depends on the situation (level of education, reservation, familiarity, region you are from, ), and that is a very complex topic. But the things you learn in school are a best-fit for most situations.

How different are Spoken and Written German? Should they be learnt bearing these differences in mind?

Written German sounds a bit stilted for certain phrases, as in English as well; e.g. you wouldn't reply to your neighbour "... with regards to your question ...", or "I am going to" but "I'm gonna" instead.

Does using Präteritum ... by speaking sound strange?

Yes, rather say "I habe gesehen" instead of "I sah" because the latter is usually perceived like the examples I mentioned above.

If the answer to the first question is "yes", then: which other characteristics are typically "written German".

Written German uses more official phrases in letters (e.g. Bezugnehmend auf), or poetic phrases in books (e.g. erwidern). Too much to be listed here.

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source | link

First, you will always have the bonus of being a foreigner if your used nuances of words or phrases don't perfectly fit, because it always depends on the situation (level of education, reservation, familiarity, region you are, ...), and that is a very complex topic. But the things you learn in school are a best-fit for most situations.

How different are Spoken and Written German? Should they be learnt bearing these differences in mind?

Written German sounds a bit stilted for certain phrases, as in English as well; e.g. you wouldn't reply to your neighbour "... with regards to your question ...", or "I am going to" but "I'm gonna" instead.

Does using Präteritum ... by speaking sound strange?

Yes, rather say "I habe gesehen" instead of "I sah" because the latter is usually perceived like the examples I mentioned above.

If the answer to the first question is "yes", then: which other characteristics are typically "written German".

Written German uses more official phrases in letters (e.g. Bezugnehmend auf), or poetic phrases in books (e.g. erwiedern). Too much to be listed here.