7 Removed the monospaced parts.
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Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with Dativa dative object and when with Akkusativaccusative one?

Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with Dativa dative object and when with Akkusativan accusative one, or can it be deduced?

How to determine if a verb in question induces akkusativ*accusative or dativdative? If there are direct objects and indirect objects, they are associated akkusativaccusative and dativdative respectively (kind of tautological):

Ich schenke dir einen Wagen [ du
[dir ist hier das indirekte Objekt; ein Wagenein Wagen das direkte Objekt ]Objekt]

But first, "direct“direct and indirect" objectindirect” objects are not a natural concept in German. And, more importantly, not all verbs are so easily managed. I'mI’m after hints that can make me save lot of time learning which verb goes with which case (if there are rules at all).

What to do if there is only one object? For sake of concreteness, let'slet’s take two verbs, say, antwortenantworten und fragenfragen which seem to be not very different: one asks a question to somebody and one answers a question to somebody. However, the first induces dativgoverns dative and the second akkusativaccusative:

Antworten Sie mir aber!

Frag mich!

How does one know thatantworten antworten goes with dative (has a indirect object-like) while fragenfragen with accusative?

Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with Dativ and when with Akkusativ?

Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with Dativ and when with Akkusativ, or can it be deduced?

How to determine if a verb in question induces akkusativ or dativ? If there are direct objects and indirect objects, they are associated akkusativ and dativ respectively (kind of tautological):

Ich schenke dir einen Wagen [ du ist hier das indirekte Objekt; ein Wagen das direkte Objekt ]

But first, "direct and indirect" object are not a natural concept in German. And, more importantly, not all verbs are so easily managed. I'm after hints that can make me save lot of time learning which verb goes with which case (if there are rules at all).

What to do if there is only one object? For sake of concreteness, let's take two verbs, say, antworten und fragen which seem to be not very different: one asks a question to somebody and one answers a question to somebody. However, the first induces dativ and the second akkusativ:

Antworten Sie mir aber Frag mich!

How does one know thatantworten goes with dative (has a indirect object-like) while fragen with accusative?

Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with a dative object and when with accusative one?

Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with a dative object and when with an accusative one, or can it be deduced?

How to determine if a verb in question induces *accusative or dative? If there are direct objects and indirect objects, they are associated accusative and dative respectively (kind of tautological):

Ich schenke dir einen Wagen
[dir ist hier das indirekte Objekt; ein Wagen das direkte Objekt]

But first, “direct and indirect” objects are not a natural concept in German. And, more importantly, not all verbs are so easily managed. I’m after hints that can make me save lot of time learning which verb goes with which case (if there are rules at all).

What to do if there is only one object? For sake of concreteness, let’s take two verbs, say, antworten und fragen which seem to be not very different: one asks a question to somebody and one answers a question to somebody. However, the first governs dative and the second accusative:

Antworten Sie mir!

Frag mich!

How does one know that antworten goes with dative (has a indirect object-like) while fragen with accusative?

6 fixed grammar, modifying the question expression
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Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with Dativ and when with Akkusativ, or can it be deduced?

How to determine if a verb in question induces akkusativ or dativ? If there are direct objects and indirect objects, they are associated akkusativ and dativ respectively (kind of tautological):

Ich schenke dir einen Wagen [ du ist hier das indirekte Objekt; ein Wagen das direkte Objekt ]

But first, "direct and indirect" object are not a natural concept in German. And, more importantly, not all verbs are so easily managed. I'm after hints that can make me save lotslot of time learning which verb goes with which case (if there are rules at all).

What to do if there is only one object? For sake of concreteness, let's take two verbs, sayingsay, antworten und fragen which seem to be not very different: one asks a question to somebody and one answers a question to somebody. However, the first induces dativ and the second akkusativ:

Antworten Sie mir aber Frag mich!

Or in the words of the rule above, howHow does one know that ich is an indirect object for antworten whilegoes with dative (has a direct object forindirect object-like) while fragen with accusative?

Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with Dativ and when with Akkusativ, or can it be deduced?

How to determine if a verb in question induces akkusativ or dativ? If there are direct objects and indirect objects, they are associated akkusativ and dativ respectively (kind of tautological):

Ich schenke dir einen Wagen [ du ist hier das indirekte Objekt; ein Wagen das direkte Objekt ]

But not all verbs are so easily managed. I'm after hints that can make me save lots of time learning which verb goes with which case (if there are rules at all).

What to do if there is only one object? For sake of concreteness, let's take two verbs, saying, antworten und fragen which seem to be not very different: one asks a question to somebody and one answers a question to somebody. However, the first induces dativ and the second akkusativ:

Antworten Sie mir aber Frag mich!

Or in the words of the rule above, how does one know that ich is an indirect object for antworten while a direct object for fragen?

Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with Dativ and when with Akkusativ, or can it be deduced?

How to determine if a verb in question induces akkusativ or dativ? If there are direct objects and indirect objects, they are associated akkusativ and dativ respectively (kind of tautological):

Ich schenke dir einen Wagen [ du ist hier das indirekte Objekt; ein Wagen das direkte Objekt ]

But first, "direct and indirect" object are not a natural concept in German. And, more importantly, not all verbs are so easily managed. I'm after hints that can make me save lot of time learning which verb goes with which case (if there are rules at all).

What to do if there is only one object? For sake of concreteness, let's take two verbs, say, antworten und fragen which seem to be not very different: one asks a question to somebody and one answers a question to somebody. However, the first induces dativ and the second akkusativ:

Antworten Sie mir aber Frag mich!

How does one know thatantworten goes with dative (has a indirect object-like) while fragen with accusative?

5 fixed grammar, modifying the question expression
source | link

Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with Dativ and when with Akkusativ, or can it be deduced?

How to determine if a verb in question induces akkusativ or dativ? If there are direct objectobjects and indirect objectobjects, they are associated akkusativ and genitivdativ respectively (kind of tautological):

Ich schenke dir einen Wagen [ du ist hier das indirekte Objekt; ein Wagen das direkte Objekt ]

But not all verbs are so easily managed. I'm after hints that can make me save lotlots of time learning which verb goes with which case (if there are rules at all).

What to do if there is only one object? For sake of concreteness, let's take two verbs, saysaying, antworten und fragen which seem to be not very different: one asks a question to somebody and one answers a question to somebody. However, the first induces dativ and the second akkusativ:

Antworten Sie mir aber Frag mich!

Or in the words of the rule above, how does one know that ich is a undirectan indirect object for antworten while a direct object for fragen?

Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with Dativ and when with Akkusativ, or can it be deduced?

How to determine if a verb in question induces akkusativ or dativ? If there are direct object and indirect object, they are associated akkusativ and genitiv respectively (kind of tautological):

Ich schenke dir einen Wagen [ du ist hier das indirekte Objekt; ein Wagen das direkte Objekt ]

But not all verbs are so easily managed. I'm after hints that can make me save lot of time learning which verb goes with which case (if there are rules at all).

What to do if there is only one object? For sake of concreteness, let's take two verbs, say, antworten und fragen which seem to be not very different: one asks a question to somebody and one answers a question to somebody. However, the first induces dativ and the second akkusativ:

Antworten Sie mir aber Frag mich!

Or in the words of the rule above, how does one know that ich is a undirect object for antworten while a direct object for fragen?

Should one necessarily learn, when a verb goes with Dativ and when with Akkusativ, or can it be deduced?

How to determine if a verb in question induces akkusativ or dativ? If there are direct objects and indirect objects, they are associated akkusativ and dativ respectively (kind of tautological):

Ich schenke dir einen Wagen [ du ist hier das indirekte Objekt; ein Wagen das direkte Objekt ]

But not all verbs are so easily managed. I'm after hints that can make me save lots of time learning which verb goes with which case (if there are rules at all).

What to do if there is only one object? For sake of concreteness, let's take two verbs, saying, antworten und fragen which seem to be not very different: one asks a question to somebody and one answers a question to somebody. However, the first induces dativ and the second akkusativ:

Antworten Sie mir aber Frag mich!

Or in the words of the rule above, how does one know that ich is an indirect object for antworten while a direct object for fragen?

4 Zeichensetzung
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3 typo in the title
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2 added 27 characters in body; edited title; added 1 characters in body; edited title
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