3

(a) Er ist stolz auf sich selbst.

is a natural translation of "He is proud of himself."

My question is whether

(b) Er ist stolz auf ihn selbst.

is correct or not? That is, when the sentence refers back to the person himself, and it is possible to use the reflexive sich, do we have to use it?

  • 1
    Er ist stolz auf sich (ohne selbst). - Er ist stolz auf ihn (zB seinen Sohn). – rogermue Oct 9 '14 at 6:26
5

Take the same sentences without selbst.

First sentence: "He is proud of himself".
Second sentence: "He is proud of him."

sich → himself
ihn → him (someone else than the subject)


Add selbst again.

The confusing part is the similarity between ihn selbst and himself, which are not the same. For reflexivity, as can be seen from above, German uses sich. Interestingly, English doesn't seem to have an etymological pendant.

Selbst however, is either an adverb like in "even she", a particle meaning "self" (selbst gemacht), or a particle emphasizing its antecedent (He himself is responsible).

First sentence variations with selbst

Selbst der Vater ist stolz auf sich. (Even the father is proud of himself.)
Der Vater selbst ist stolz auf sich. (The father himself is proud of himself.)
Der Vater ist stolz auf sich selbst. (The father is proud of himself.)

Second sentence variations

Selbst der Vater ist stolz auf ihn. (Even the father is proud of him.)
Der Vater selbst ist stolz auf ihn. (The father himself is proud of him.)
Der Vater ist stolz auf ihn selbst. (here, selbst does not refer to "father")

Not sure if the last construction can be translated nicely. Anyway, that variation is rarely used and often ambiguous:

Er hat sie selbst gesehen. (selbst can refer to both pronouns)

To unambiguously emphasize the object, put it in front:

Sie selbst hat er gesehen.
Sie selbst wurde von ihm gesehen. (passive)


(Adressing the last paragraph) The verb you need for a certain meaning is either reflexive or not1. If it is, you have to use the corresponding reflexive pronoun:

Reflexivity with acc. pron.   Reflexivity with dat. pron.
ich mich        wir uns       ich mir         wir uns
du dich         ihr euch      du dir          ihr euch
er/sie/es sich  sie sich      er/sie/es sich  sie sich

1There are only very few cases where you can choose to leave out the pronoun (sich flüchten, sich denken).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.