1

I need to say

"I am a programmer of a junior level"

in german.

Can it be translated as "ein Programmierer von junior-ebene?". Maybe it's better to use english word "Level" in the german sentence?

Important:

I would like to stress that I am a programmer of a certain level. So I need the exact translation of english phrase with a preposition "of": "of a junior level".

Thanks a lot!

2

I was thinking of an appropriate translation for your sentence but it's hard.

I have one suggestion but it does not fit 100% though it reflects the meaning of the English Junior pretty well:

The vocable is Nachwuchskraft and you can use the word Nachwuchs as a prefix to the further field you want to refer to such as in the following:

He is a junior-level programmer within the company.

becomes

Er ist ein Nachwuchsprogrammierer in der Firma.

Hope this helps.

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4

Are you programmer (Programmierer) or developer (Entwickler)? Usually you just use those terms, and if you really want to point out your inexperience, you can prepend Junior-, that seems very common these days.

Ich arbeite als Junior-Entwickler bei der AB GmbH.

But really, I wouldn't point it out that much, just use Programmierer or Entwickler, whichever you are.

For example you can say you work as Java-Programmierer or Android-Programmierer or Software-Entwickler, and so on. (only the combination Software-Programmierer sounds a little strange)

Nachwuchskraft sounds weird to me, but Nachwuchsprogrammierer would be okay too, still sounds like putting too much focus on your inexperience.

Just read the comment you are looking for a job:

Ich habe 2 Jahre Berufserfahrung als Java-Programmierer.

or

Ich habe 2 Jahre Berufserfahrung als Programmierer in den Bereichen Java, C++ und MySQL.
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  • 2
    indeed it's true that prepending Junior is really common these days and is a totally legit translation. However, I would say a Junior-Entwickler is used in more informal contexts whereas Nachswuchsprogrammierer might also be used more formally such as in a job announcement. – marc wellman Oct 25 '14 at 22:03
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    @Alfred: I have been a programmer or software developer for almost 30 years now, and I still don't know the difference. I can't find any agreement over the distinction on the Internet. – Walter Tross Oct 26 '14 at 5:46
2

It depends on context. If you are referring to the common distinction between Junior/Senior made in companies, then use the company title:

Zurzeit arbeite ich als Junior Programmer bei Codehack Inc.

Edit: as you want to speak about your current level of experience, you would possibly speak of "Kenntnisse" or "Erfahrung"

Ich habe geringe/mittelmäßige/gute/sehr gute Kenntnisse in Java
Ich habe wenig/mittlere/viel/sehr viel Erfahrung in/mit Java

You can't translate your sentence 1:1, at least I don't think so. Let's construct an example where you could, to show you how "of a" is translated:

I am a CEO of a large company. Ich bin der Vorstandsvorsitzende eines großen Konzerns.

You would not use any preposition, but Genetiv. You could use Dativ with "von einem" as well but naaah...

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  • Thanks for the answer. But what if I need to say it with a word "of"? I would like to stress that I am a programmer of a certain level. Which german preposition should I use? – Alex Herman Oct 25 '14 at 19:46
  • Ah, I am sorry. What I actully meant is I need to express in german "of what level" am I a programmer. So, for example - "Ich bin ein von Junior-Ebene Java Programmierer". Is usage of preposition "von" correct in this case? And what about word "Ebene"? Maybe it's better to use the english word "Level" in german sentence? Thanks. – Alex Herman Oct 25 '14 at 20:44
  • You've typed: "Vorstandsvorsitzende eines großen Konzerns". I am only looking for a job. So I do not have a position at a company. I am a only programmer of a junior level, who's looking for a job - which needs to be translated. – Alex Herman Oct 25 '14 at 20:54

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