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This question asked for common ways to say "Thank you very much" in a formal setting. What about in an informal setting? Say, you want to express (extreme) gratitude to your friend?

Since many of the answers in the other question are likely to be relevant, I list them here:

Vielen herzlichen Dank // Vielen, vielen Dank // Vielen lieben Dank. // (Meinen) besten Dank.

Dankeschön! // Danke sehr!

Ich danke vielmals! // Ich danke Ihnen sehr

Ich möchte Ihnen meinen allergrößten Dank zum Ausdruck bringen!

Ich möchte mich bei Ihnen (für Ihr/e/n [random positive attribute]) herzlichst bedanken.

Please comment on the appropriateness of these in an informal setting, and add new ones that are appropriate in an informal setting.

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The first three lines are also good for informal usage, as long as you replace "Sie" mit "du".

Vielen herzlichen Dank // Vielen, vielen Dank // Vielen lieben Dank. // (Meinen) besten Dank.

Dankeschön! // Danke sehr!

Ich danke vielmals! // Ich danke dir sehr.

Other ways could be for example:

Danke. // Hab vielen Dank. // Danke dir. // Tausend Dank!

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If you're looking for something that's commonly used & informal you may use:

Vielen Dank!

Besten Dank!

Dankeschön!

Danke Dir!

And please, please never even think of using

Ich möchte Ihnen meinen allergrößten Dank zum Ausdruck bringen!

I am not sure where you dug that up, but I've been living in Germany for a quarter century and I've yet to hear someone say this. It's horrible. Overly formal, outdated and simply should not be used any more. Honestly, if you use this, people might even think you're mocking them.

Ich möchte mich bei Ihnen (für Ihr/e/n [random positive attribute]) herzlichst bedanken.

That one works. It's also a very formal way of saying thanks, but I've seen this in use / used this in office settings and in email correspondence with co-workers.

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  • "Danke dir vielmals!" is the exact translation for use under friends.
  • "Danke Ihnen vielmals!" is the translation in formal cases.

you = du/Sie = dir/Ihnen... see for example http://www.dict.cc/?s=you

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