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One way I find reviewed human translations of non-dictionary words or phrases is to find the identical Wikipedia page in another language.

I came across Wort-Bild-Marke, which has no "In anderen Sprachen" links.

Duden.de defines it as

sowohl Schrift als auch grafische Elemente enthaltendes Logo

my translation

Logo containing both font and graphic elements

Other related DE wiki pages are

Is there a word in English that captures the meaning of Wort-Bild-Marke? Or is Logo with some modifiers, i.e. Text-based logo?

Other online dictionaries have the terms without hyphens (dict.cc), or doesn't exist (dict.leo.org).

closed as off-topic by Matthias, Em1, Carsten S, Wrzlprmft, Stephie Jan 15 '15 at 17:12

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    This question appears to be off-topic because it is essentially about hte English, not German language. Translation requests to English are on-topic only if the translation is needed to understand the German word. Beside this, the question might be on-topic (if rephrased properly, i.e. describing the term instead of asking for a translation) on English Language Learners. – Matthias Jan 15 '15 at 14:23
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    I think, at least going by the Duden description, "Emblem" would be a good fit. I've never heard Wrt-Bild-Marke anywhere before. – Emanuel Jan 16 '15 at 17:48
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Although I consider this question off-topic here (because it is a question about English, not German): it is often worthwhile having a look at linguee.com, in particular for terms from economics, politics and law. There you can search through real-world texts together with their respective translations.

For "Wort-Bild-Marke" (or Wortbildmarke, that's essentially the same), you'll find

http://www.linguee.com/german-english/translation/wortbildmarke.html

where the most often used term seems to be "word and figurative mark". This is also the term the German Patent Office uses in it's English FAQ.

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