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In German, is there a preferred way of saying with whom or with which?

For example,

Die jungen Kinder, mit wem ich arbeite, sind schikaniert worden.

The young children, with whom I work, have been bullied.

Or is this construction better? It seems less personal to me, as if I were not to know them.

Die jungen Kinder, mit den ich arbeite, sind schikaniert worden.

The young children, with which I work, have been bullied.

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    Just a comment on your subject line: I find it a bit confusing - after all, you are NOT asking after "which" or "whom", but after the German equivalents/translations. As the question stands, I interpret it as a question about English grammar, which would be off topic.m – Gerhard Feb 6 '15 at 21:23
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    And that also applies to parts of the question. – Carsten S Feb 6 '15 at 22:58
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The sentence requires a dative relative pronoun which in this case would be denen because die jungen Kinder is plural. So correct would be

Die jungen Kinder, mit denen ich arbeite, sind schikaniert worden.

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German does not have distinct personal pronouns like English, only relative pronouns, with the exception that damit, womit cannot be used of persons; mit dem or mit den is used instead. You have to rely on context.

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