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In my book TestDaf kompakt, it states we don’t have am Mittag in German language.

excerpt from the book

Is it true?

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    Of course there is both mittags and am Mittag. What does the book say exactly? – chirlu May 15 '15 at 18:01
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    Depending on the region it might be unusual. I've never heard or used am Mittag in Austria. To me Mittag is a rather precise point in time (namely, noon) so it can't be quite used like Vormittag or Nachmittag. My preposition of choice would be zu Mittag. – Ingmar May 15 '15 at 18:04
  • @chirlu I added a picture from the book. – DSaad May 15 '15 at 18:06
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    The book doesn't specifically mention "am Mittag" or "zu Mittag", but that doesn't mean that those collocations don't exist. Check out Duden if you need more examples: duden.de/rechtschreibung/mittags – Ingmar May 15 '15 at 18:09
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    @Ingmar in all of the exercises, they don't include "am Mittag" and they never mention it. – DSaad May 15 '15 at 18:12
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The options given to you in your book are only some of many. Every region has preferred ways of saying one thing or another.

For example, I wouldn’t use am Morgen, morgens or anything else related to Morgen being the beginning of a day except in the phrase guten Morgen. Instead, I refer to the time before lunch as Früh: in der Früh, frühs (not as good as the other ones) or just heute früh. In the same way, I often mingle abends and nachts together to auf die Nacht.

The expression am Mittag — and also zu Mittag in some areas — are allowed and widely used, only maybe just not as widely as am Morgen or am Abend. Although I couldn’t quote that if my life depended on it.

Things are further convoluted by the fact that Mittag is a rather short timeframe; it lasts less than two hours, usually only one. Things are also convoluted by the fact that Mittag can also be the short form of Mittagessen — so maybe the book was trying to do you some good to avoid misinterpreting something?

Frankly, I have no clue why they left it out and all I have to say is that chirlu nailed it:

When some term is not listed in a limited learner’s vocabulary, you can’t conclude from that fact alone that it doesn’t exist.

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4

The expression am Mittag is correct and used in German, but it may be less important and less useful than the other expressions in that list from the book, because those refer to longer parts of the day.

When some term is not listed in a limited learner’s vocabulary, you can’t conclude from that fact alone that it doesn’t exist.

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