5

The question is on the verbs within the daß clauses at the end of this quote.

»Du Dingschen«, rief er, lehnte sich zurück und lachte, hochrot im Gesicht, mit der Kraft des Gesättigten. Vergebens suchte sich Karl das Benehmen Herrn Pollunders zu erklären. Der saß vor seinem Teller und sah in ihn, als geschehe dort das eigentlich Wichtige. Er zog Karls Sessel nicht näher zu sich, und wenn er einmal sprach, so sprach er zu allen, aber zu Karl hatte er nichts Besonderes zu reden. Dagegen duldete er, daß Green, dieser alte, ausgepichte New Yorker Junggeselle, mit deutlicher Absicht Klara berührte, daß er Karl, Pollunders Gast beleidigte oder wenigstens als Kind behandelte und wer weiß zu welchen Taten sich stärkte und vordrang.

For context, click this link. The quote is the second to the last paragraph.

  1. Am I correct to understand that the verbs are all in indicative simple past (Indikativ Präteritum)? At least vordrang could be nothing else.

  2. Can a subjunctive be used (instead of indicative)? For example (using Konjunctiv I):

Dagegen duldete er, dass Green, dieser alte, ausgepichte New Yorker Junggeselle, mit deutlicher Absicht Klara berühre, dass er Karl, Pollunders Gast beleidige oder wenigstens als Kind behandele und wer weiß zu welchen Taten sich stärke und vordringe.

The case I imagine is one where the speaker does not wish to assert any proposition occurring in the dass context but only that someone endured it. For example, the suggestion may be that no touching, insulting, etc. happened, but only that Mr. Pollunder believed they did, or that it was questionable whether any of touching, insulting etc. actually happened. (I am not saying that the above fictional situation lends itself to that interpretation.)

The motivation for my question is this: I understand that the subjunctive mood can be used to indicate that the speaker remains noncommittal or even skeptical as to what is being reported. Grammar books give examples of reported speech and certain typical verbs of doubting, wishing etc. I am wondering whether this use can extend to context generated by any verb, e.g. enduring, marveling, being relieved etc. or I should just stick to the grammar book examples.

  • I can't give you a good explanation, but a) is correct. (If I remember correctly). b) does not really work. I just doesn't make sense. Konjunktiv I is for the indirect speech and virtues. But it's already happening (he IS actually touching Klara) so you need the Indikativ. – wernersbacher May 28 '15 at 8:03
  • "Dagegen würde er es geduldet haben, daß Green, dieser alte, ausgepichte New Yorker Junggeselle, mit deutlicher Absicht Klara berührt hätte, daß er Karl, Pollunders Gast beleidigte hätte oder wenigstens als Kind behandelte hätte und wer weiß zu welchen Taten sich gestärkt (hätte) und vordrängt hätte. (Konjunktiv II Futur II) In this case he would have allowed it, but it's not sure if it has happend. But it doesn't make sense in the story context anymore. So the original is the best solution – wernersbacher May 28 '15 at 8:21
4

Am I correct to understand that the verbs are all in indicative simple past (Indikativ Präteritum)?

Yes, you are.

Can a subjunctive be used (instead of indicative)?

No. The usage of the subjunctive I we are talking about here¹ is for statements which only are used in an abstract but not in a factual way, i.e., they do not need to actually happen. For example:

Ich sagte, dass Green Klara berühre.
Ich dachte, dass Green Klara berühre.
Die Auffassung, dass Green Klara berührt habe, wurde bekräftigt.

In contrast, the indicative is used, if the statement automatically contains that something actually happens (or does not happen), e.g.:

Ich sah, dass Green Klara berührte.
Ich verhinderte, dass Green Klara berührte.

In particular, dulden implies that something is endured and thus actually happens:

Ich duldete, dass Green Klara berührte.

Note that the usage of the subjunctive I or indicative here is only a consequence of the nature of the main clause’s verb, if you so wish. The speaker cannot indicate whether something actually happened by choosing between subjunctive I or indicative². However the speaker may use the subjunctive II instead of the subjunctive I to indicate that something did not happen:

Ich sagte, dass Green Klara berühren würde.
Ich dachte, dass Green Klara berühren würde.
Die Auffassung, dass Green Klara berührt hätte, wurde bekräftigt.

In all these examples, the speaker indicates that Green did not touch Klara. Note that this does not work if the subclause requires the indicative mood and the following examples are wrong:

* Ich sah, dass Green Klara berührt hätte.
* Ich verhinderte, dass Green Klara berührt hätte.
* Ich duldete, dass Green Klara berührt hätte.

To make no statement about the factuality of Green touching Klara in the latter statement, the speaker has to resort to other means, e.g.:

Ich duldete die Möglichkeit, dass Green Klara berührt.

If the speaker wants to state, however, that Green did indeed not touch Klara, but if it had happened, he would have endured it, he could use a conditional clause using the subjunctive II:

Ich hätte es geduldet, wenn Green Klara berührt hätte.

This condition can also be implicit:

Ich hätte es geduldet, dass Green Klara berührt hätte. (Wenn es passiert wäre.)

Note that the subjunctive II in the subclause is inherited from the main clause here.

So, to sum it up: Whether the subjunctive I can be used, depends on the verb (or whatever the subclause depends on) and is not the choice of the speaker. This can be decided from the meaning of the verb, but translation subtleties may lead to a wrong result here. In particular the mood cannot be used to indicate non-committment or skepsis. However, the subjunctive II can be used to indicate non-factuality.


As a rule of thumb, you use the subjunctive I whenever you can replace the respective subclause with something in quotation marks, for example:

Ich sagte, dass Green Klara berühre.
Ich sagte: »Green berührt Klara.«

Ich dachte, dass Green Klara berühre.
Ich dachte: »Green berührt Klara.«

Die Auffassung, dass Green Klara berührt habe, wurde bekräftigt. Die Auffassung »Green hat Klara berührt« wurde bekräftigt.

Contrast with:

Ich sah, dass Green Klara berührte.
* Ich sah: »Green berührt Klara.«

Ich verhinderte, dass Green Klara berührte.
* Ich verhinderte: »Green berührt Klara.«

Ich duldete, dass Green Klara berührte.
* Ich duldete: »Green berührt Klara.«


¹ i.e., direct speech and similar. Contrast with the use of the subjunctive I as an imperative to the third person.
² At least in standard German. In colloquial German, whenever some sort of subjunctive can be used, the three moods (indicative, subjunctive I, subjunctive II) are mostly used arbitrarily or only the indicative mood is used – at least according to my obervation.

  • In colloquial language, the subjunctive isn't used at all, except for wäre and hätte. Only indicative and würde + infinitive exist. – chirlu May 28 '15 at 10:48
  • 1
    @chirlu: That does not quite match my experience. Anyway, this probably depends on the exact sociocultural background of the speaker, i.e., location, age, educational background, etc. – Wrzlprmft May 28 '15 at 11:27
  • Yeah, true. Though regarding educational background, it is not because people were unable to construct the verb forms. – chirlu May 28 '15 at 11:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.