4

This question also has an answer here (in German):
Schlussformel für Beschwerdebrief?

I am writing a complaint letter and want to know how to end it. The issue was pretty bad and I'm very unsatisfied/offended with the service, so does "Mit freundlichen Grüßen" sound ironic? (I'm definitely not freundlich in the letter).

Is there something more neutral like the English Regards or Sincerely?

  • 1
    the linked thread has all the relevant answers. you may indeed say Mit freundlichen Grüßen or Freundliche Grüße or Hochachtungsvoll. While your letter may sound unfriendly it is important to not be offending. – Alex Jul 28 '15 at 7:38
  • This should not have been closed. There is consensus that questions in one language can't be duplicates of questions in the other language. – chirlu Jul 28 '15 at 8:05
  • Once I also wrote a complaint letter, and ended it with »mit Grüßen«, so I just omitted the obligatory »freundlichen«. I guess the message was clear. – Hubert Schölnast Jul 28 '15 at 17:28
1

Generally speaking it is not a good advice to be offending or harsh in a letter. Even an unfriendly letter, even if deserved, is not something one would advise you to write.

To answer your question whether it sounds ironic: no, it does not. It's okay to tease a bit, but you should be able to convey you very bad opinion with neutral (or not offending) words.

However, you can end your letter with

Freundliche Grüße
Mit freundlichen Grüßen
Hochachtungsvoll

At least, those are most common. If you want, you can just write down your name without any greeting phrase.

  • 3
    Today Hochachtungsvoll is no longer in use. It may only occasionally still be seen in letters from old to very old people (80+). – Takkat Jul 28 '15 at 8:49
  • 1
    I'm 24 and I complain all the time - always hochachtungsvolly ;-) – Alex Jul 28 '15 at 8:52
  • On this matter there is a nice article on Knigge.de (not to be taken too seriously). There also is a summary on Wikipedia where "Hochachtung" would still be appropriate... not that I want to correct you, but it may be preceived different to the intention you had in your letters of complaint ;) – Takkat Jul 28 '15 at 9:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.