1

Using a dictionary, it says so ... wie is as ... as. Here is the sentence:

Im Sommer tragen Frauen gern einen leichten Rock, ein T-Shirt oder ein Top, so wie Jana.

Does this mean same as Jana?

  • Are you sure as same as exists in English? – chirlu Aug 28 '15 at 12:37
6

No. Don't confuse so wie with so ... wie ....

Er ist so klug wie Jana. => He is as smart as Jana.

In your sentence, it's translated with like or as.

In summer, women wear skirts, T-shirts or tops — like Jana.
In summer, women wear skirts, T-shirts or tops — as Jana does.

| improve this answer | |
0

The expression so wie is an elliptic (where something is missing, albeit fully understandable) form of so … wie.

Das Gras ist grün, so (grün) wie ein Frosch.

Im Sommer tragen Frauen einen Rock, so (einen Rock) wie Jana.

And of course only exceptionally one would use the explicit form.

Im Sommer tragen Frauen gern einen leichten Rock, ein T-Shirt oder ein Top, so einen leichten Rock, ein T-Shirt oder ein Top wie Jana [trägt].

(The as .. as translation would also not work here.)

The english translations loose this relationship between explicit and elliptic form.

(so) schön wie Mona Lisa — as beautiful as Mona Lisa

Sie ist schön, so wie Mona Lisa. — She is beautiful, like Mona Lisa.

This is not exhaustive, but it makes clear: When you come to this level of detail, word by word translation becomes useless. There are nuances between the latter examples, which are expressed by ellipsis in german and different words in english (and likely other languages).

| improve this answer | |
  • If at all, it would be "... so einen leichten Rock, [...] wie Jana es trägt/anhat" or "so einen leichten Rock wie Jana's" — "...so einen Rock wie Jana" would compare "Rock" with "Jana". That said, I don't think it's an ellipse, and if it were, rather an ellipse for "... so wie Jana es tut". – Em1 Aug 28 '15 at 20:21
  • Danke, @Em1. Verbessert. Aber "einen Rock wie Jana es trägt" ist schräg. Vgl. "Ich möchte gerne einen Ball oder ein Auto haben, so einen Ball oder ein Auto wie Werner [hat]." … aber nicht "… es hat"! Und der Apostroph ist kein Genitivzeichen im Deutschen. – Dirk Aug 28 '15 at 20:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.