3

What is the subject of this sentence?

Diese Hast und das Laufen, dazu das Stoßen des Wagens, der Benzingeruch und das Blenden von Straße und Himmel hatten sicher schuld daran, daß ich einnickte.

I can think of at least three possibilities

(a) Diese Hast und das Laufen
(b) das Stoßen des Wagens, der Benzingeruch und das Blenden von Straße und Himmel
(c) Diese Hast und das Laufen, dazu das Stoßen des Wagens, der Benzingeruch und das Blenden von Straße und Himmel

If it were an English sentence, I would have liked to see a comma between Himmel and hatten so I can say that (a) was the subject.

As between (a) and (c) as subject, one way to bring out the critical difference may be to ask which of the following is correct:

(x) Diese Hast, dazu das Stoßen des Wagens hatte sicher schuld daran, daß ich einnickte.
(y) Diese Hast, dazu das Stoßen des Wagens hatten sicher schuld daran, daß ich einnickte.

Background: The (first) quote is from Georg Goyert and Hans Georg Brenner's translation of Camus's L'Étranger. For what it's worth (in answering the question), the original goes:

Cette hâte, cette course, c’est à cause de tout cela sans doute, ajouté aux cahots, à l’odeur d’essence, à la réverbération de la route et du ciel, que je me suis assoupi.

3
  • 'Alles' (c) hatte Schuld daran, dass ich einnickte. ;-)

In contrary to english we only use a comma to separate items of an enumeration from each other. There's no need for the last one to be separated from the rest of the sentence unless it is positioned at the end of a clause and needs to be separated from an other clause.

If you used the verb 'sein' than it would be:

  • (alle) waren schuld daran...

Or you could even substitute it with a collective expression like 'alles':

  • alles war schuld daran...

But in any case the subject is the whole block!

|improve this answer|||||
  • Great, but can you please see (x) and (y)? – Catomic Sep 15 '15 at 16:08
  • 1
    Franz 'und' Lena hatten die Schuld daran vs. Franz 'oder' Lena hatte die Schuld daran... - But that doesn't change the fact that both together form the subject - So in your example I would say that 'dazu' means 'und', hence 'hatten'... – mramosch Sep 15 '15 at 16:11
1

No addition to mramosch’s answer concerning the question of a), b) or c). Commas in German generally do not denote pauses in speech but rather serve as a separating measure for parts of sentences and the like. As such, there is never, never ever a comma between the subject and the verb of a sentence (assuming SV-word order) unless the subject is a relative clause (which is always separated by commas). Most notably, commas like the one after notably just there are explicitly forbidden in German.

Concerning the question of x) or y), there is sometimes considerable confusion even amoung German speakers. Questions about whether a list requires singular or plural frequently pop up here (and are then often closed as duplicates).

However, there are also rather clear cases like your example. It lists a set of two and explicitly says that both had their share of blame. While technically an argument could be attempted to use singular, the choice of plural just seems so much more natural. Compare:

Hans hat Schuld, dass ich eingeschlafen bin.
Maria hat Schuld, dass ich eingeschlafen bin.
Hans und Maria haben Schuld, dass ich eingeschlafen bin.
Hans, dazu Maria haben Schuld, dass ich eingeschlafen bin.

Die Hast hat Schuld, dass ich eingeschlafen bin.
Das Stoßen hat Schuld, dass ich eingeschlafen bin.
Die Hast und das Stoßen haben Schuld, dass ich eingeschlafen bin.
Die Hast, dazu das Stoßen haben Schuld, dass ich eingeschlafen bin.


A note on Schuld/schuld: According to the reformed orthography, because one has the blame (in a literal translation) and because you can usually only have objects, i.e. nouns, Schuld in that phrase is nowadays considered a noun and would be capitalised. Ich bin schuld would, however, be considered an adjective and thus written in lower case.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Wie stehst du zu schuld als 'Adjektiv' wenn es nur prädikativ verwendbar ist? Attributiv müsste ich schuldig sagen, was zwar die selbe Bedeutung hat, aber doch nicht das selbe 'Adjektiv' ist. -> Ekel - das Essen ist ek(e)lig - das ek(e)lige Essen - Ich schreibe 'schuld' zwar auch klein (wegen dem 'ist') aber hier ist doch noch sehr stark das Nomen zu spüren... – mramosch Sep 17 '15 at 1:17
  • @mramosch Es gibt durchaus Adjektive, die (standardsprachlich; für einzelne Umgangssprachen mag das anders sein) nur prädikativ verwendbar sind: weg, ab, an, aus, auf etc. Darüberhinaus sollte das nur die wiedergekäute Argumentation des Rechtschreibrates sein ;) – Jan Sep 17 '15 at 8:35
  • _@Jan: 'weg, ab, an, aus, auf etc.' - Meinst du damit Präfixe ? Wie in -> 'das weggeworfene Brot, die abgetrennte Hand, die angehörigen Personen, der ausgefranste Teppich etc.'... ;-) ? – mramosch Sep 17 '15 at 9:52
  • @mramosch Nein, Adjektive. »die Tür ist zu/auf«, »das Geld ist weg« etc ;) – Jan Sep 17 '15 at 10:12
  • _@Jan: OK, jetzt hab' ich's...! Danke. - Vielleicht einfach nur deshalb, weil es keine 'Adjektive' sind sondern nur prädikativ genutzte Ergänzungen ;-) ? Ein Adjektiv , das nicht attributiv verwendet werden kann... - das gefällt mir wieder überhaupt nicht... - erinnerst du dich noch an unsere Diskussion?german.stackexchange.com/questions/25403/… – mramosch Sep 17 '15 at 10:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.