1

In English, need to and must are basically the same thing. Kann man dafür brauchen sagen? Oder muss man müssen benutzen? (Can you say brauchen? Or must you use müssen?)

1) Ich brauche zu essen., oder Ich muss essen.
2) Ich brauche ein neues Handy kaufen., oder Ich muss ein neues Handy kaufen.

  • 1
    Not sure what I think of mixed language questions. I would prefer a question in only one language. If you attempt German and it is badly phrased, we will do our best to phrase it bettter and correct out errors. I'll ask meta soon. – Jan Sep 19 '15 at 16:07
7

You can checkout the different meanings of brauchen in a dictionary like the Duden.

The answer to your question is a clear "yes and no" ;-)

In some cases, you can use brauchen to express need to. These are cases that contain a restriction or negation, so strictly speaking you can express don't need to, only need to and the like this way:

Er braucht heute nicht zu arbeiten. He doesn't need to work today.
Du brauchst es mir nur zu sagen. You only need to tell me.

In colloquial speech you can omit the 'zu', because many people forget the old rule

Wer brauchen ohne zu gebraucht, braucht brauchen überhaupt nicht zu gebrauchen.
Whoever uses brauchen without zu doesn't need to use brauchen at all.

Beside these cases, you cannot use brauchen this way. So in your examples it is

Ich muss (etwas) essen.
Ich muss ein neues Handy kaufen.

Also note that

Ich brauche zu essen.

is correct, but means

I need food.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    In the last example, there is an implicit indefinite pronoun (Ich brauche was zu essen). Also, even people who do know the rule may decide to ignore it and instead watch the birth of a new modal verb. (In related news, the final t in third person singular is often dropped, as in er brauch gar nicht wiederzukommen, similar to the conjugation of other modal verbs.) – chirlu Sep 19 '15 at 4:04
1

Usually, brauchen will be used with an accusative object in the meaning of I need something.

Ich brauche Essen.
Ich brauche ein Dach über dem Kopf.

This conflicts so strongly with brauchen’s other usage meaning need to that that usage is restricted to the cases Matthias mentioned: When there is another word at least between brauchen and the infinitive.

Ich brauche Arbeit. (noun)
Ich brauche zu arbeiten. (doesn’t work)
Ich brauche heute zu arbeiten. (at the very least extremely uncommon if not wrong)
Ich brauche nur heute zu arbeiten. (works; only today, not tomorrow)
Ich brauche nicht zu arbeiten. (works)


Normalerweise gebraucht man brauchen mit einem Akkusativobjekt in der Bedeutung benötigen.

Ich brauche Essen.
Ich brauche ein Dach über dem Kopf.

Das beißt sich so sehr mit dem anderen Gebrauch von brauchen in der Bedeutung müssen, dass dessen Verwendung auf die Fälle, die Matthias erwähnt hat, beschränkt ist: Wenn mindestens ein weiteres Wort zwischen brauchen und dem Infinitiv steht.

Ich brauche Arbeit. (noun)
Ich brauche zu arbeiten. (doesn’t work)
Ich brauche heute zu arbeiten. (at the very least extremely uncommon if not wrong)
Ich brauche nur heute zu arbeiten. (works; only today, not tomorrow)
Ich brauche nicht zu arbeiten. (works)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Zweisprachige Antwort, weil die Frage sich nicht auf eine Sprache beschränkt // bilingual answer becaues the question doesn’t use only one language. – Jan Sep 19 '15 at 16:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.