9

Can someone translate this into English:

Er hat mit ihr geschäkert.

The verb "schäckern" has no entry in dict.leo.org .

UPDATE

The correct spelling is schäkern which you can find in most dictionaries.

  • Shake it, babe! If you write it correctly with one 'k', you'll find it at dict.leo.org as to flirt with so. . As schäckern, you would need to spell it like meckern, while it is longer, like Apothekern: "Wir schäkern, mit den Apothjekern". – user unknown Feb 3 '12 at 2:20
  • 3
    I vote to close because when I tried searching "schäckern" I didn't find it as you said, but the spelling was suggested. – Alenanno Feb 4 '12 at 12:01
17

I think the correct spelling is "geschäkert":

VERB: schäkern | schäkerte | geschäkert

So, the meaning of the sentence should be:

He was flirting with her.

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19

It's not "schäckern", it's schäkern, without the 'c'. The origin of that word is:

"Rotwelsch or Gaunersprache, [...] a secret language, a cant or thieves' argot, spoken by covert groups primarily in southern Germany and Switzerland." (Wikipedia, see also Gibt es Rotwelsch mittlerweile auch in der gehobenen Sprache?)

I believe it used to be more common a few decades ago (that's not scientific, but a childhood memory).

With the 'c' gone, you find it in leo.org: my favourite translation here would be "to dally with sb.", but all others are fine.

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