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How do you specify your street address in German. For example if you live in street xyz how do you say "I live in xyz"?

closed as off-topic by Em1, boaten, Burki, chirlu, unor Jan 8 '16 at 16:46

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For referring to a street you would usually say

Ich wohne in der Kirchenstraße 4. (I live in Church Street 4)


For a square (der Platz) or an alley (der Weg - loosely translated) you would use

Ich wohne am Kirchenplatz 4. (I live at Church Square 4) [pls correct me if it is on Church Square correctly]

Ich wohne am Van-Dyck-Weg 4. (I live in Van-Dyck-Alley 4)

For the two examples above you could also omit the am before the street name. However, I feel like at least in Austria this is not very common.

Ich wohne Kirchenplatz 4. (I live at Church Square 4) [pls correct me if it is on Church Square correctly]

Ich wohne Van-Dyck-Weg 4. (I live in Van-Dyck-Alley 4)


For referring to street names made up of more than one word you would most often use

Ich wohne An der Schanze 4. (I live at An der Schanze 4)

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    In my opinoin ommiting the "am" is/sounds just wrong, although it seems to gain popularity, especially with young people and those whose first language is not german. – wastl Jan 8 '16 at 14:27
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    To me it seems the only way omitting the preposition could be correct is if the street/square name already includes a preposition. – O. R. Mapper Jan 8 '16 at 16:55
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You would say

Ich wohne in der street name + number.

If the street is not a Straße but a Weg, you would say

Ich wohne am street name + number.

Two examples:

Ich wohne in der Goethestraße 5.

Ich wohne am Feldweg 3.

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    I'm not sure about the usage "am Feldweg 3" as opposed to "im Feldweg 3" or even "Feldweg 3" without any preposition (see jera's answer). Could it be a regional thing? – Jan Jan 8 '16 at 13:54
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    I gave "am" vs. "im" a long thought, and from my feeling I would use "am". But I guess at least none of the three possibilities would be seen as wrong? – mitoha Jan 8 '16 at 13:57
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    It would certainly be understood either way. I guess the problem is that the preposition to be used differs with the street name, e.g. "an der Straße" vs. "am Weg" vs. "an der Stiege" vs. "in (?) der Twiete" (I live in Hamburg ;-) ), so there is no one right preposition that catches them all. So for me, it's entirely possible that different regions use different prepositions. Unfortunately, the Atlas zur Deutschen Alltagssprache doesn't say anything about that. – Jan Jan 8 '16 at 14:20
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    @Jan I agree with you on the regional differences! – jera Jan 8 '16 at 14:30
  • @Jan: There might even be yet another factor: To me, "Ich wohne in der Hauptstraße." and "Ich wohne in der Hauptstraße 42." both sound correct. However, "Ich wohne im Rathausplatz." sounds wrong, whereas "Ich wohne im Rathausplatz 42." sounds perfectly normal again. When I think about the difference, it seems that once a building number is given, the in refers to the building (that you live within, unless you want to express you sleep in a tent next to the building), whereas in the sentences without a number, in is (at least in my place) only used for lengthy locations such as streets. – O. R. Mapper Jan 11 '16 at 12:23

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