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When I create a sentence using »nämlich«, can I do it two ways with a comma and a period between two parts of the sentence? Also, is the word order correct?

Is the example listed below correct?

sentence given: Jan möchte im Kurs deutsche Texte lernen. Sie liebt deutsche Literatur.

  1. Jan möchte im Kurs deutsche Texte lernen. Sie liebt nämlich deutsche Literatur.
  2. Jan möchte im Kurs deutsche Texte lernen, sie liebt nämlich deutsche Literatur.
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Both are correct, however the word "nämlich" implies a strong connection between the two statements. Unless you want to introduce a pause for effect, I would use a comma or a hyphen in this case. There are other cases where a full stop would be better, for example if the sentence would become too long otherwise and the first sentence implies that there is more to come (so the nämlich does not come as a surprise to the reader).

Tangentially, Jan is a boy's name.

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    In German. In England, my name was often initially mistaken for a girl’s name. – Jan Sep 25 '16 at 18:11
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»Jan« is a male first name. So the personal pronoun referring to Jan must be male too. So it has to be:

sentence given: Jan möchte im Kurs deutsche Texte lernen. Er liebt deutsche Literatur.

  1. Jan möchte im Kurs deutsche Texte lernen. Er liebt nämlich deutsche Literatur.
  2. Jan möchte im Kurs deutsche Texte lernen, er liebt nämlich deutsche Literatur.

The answer to the question, if you can join two main sentences together with a comma resulting in one sentence, has nothing to do with the usage of certain words. So it is irrelevant, if there is a »nämlich« or not. And in this case there is no difference between English and German grammar:

Mein Auto ist alt. Es ist rostig.
My car is old. It is rusty.

Mein Auto ist alt, es ist rostig.
My car is old, it is rusty.

When you use »nämlich«, then you use it to tell a reason for something:

Mein Auto ist rostig. Es ist alt.
My car is rusty. It is old.

Mein Auto ist rostig. Es ist nämlich alt.
My car is rusty. The reason is: It is old.

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    Jan mag auf Deutsch als Jungenname erkannt werden, aber in England wurde der Name oft für einen Mädchennamen gehalten (Zeitraum: Mitte Neunziger). – Jan Sep 25 '16 at 18:11
  • "In English it (Jan) is a shortened form of the first names Janice, January or Janet" en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_(name) – Iris Sep 25 '16 at 18:27
  • Actually, that grammar is not the same as English. In English, you cannot simply put a comma between two independent clauses. You can either add a period or a semicolon OR you can add a conjunction. – Megan Holloran Nov 20 '18 at 22:58

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