5

From my understanding, the general meaning of the word mögen is to like. And the addition of the word gern in a sentence such as Ich trinke Kaffee gern means that you like to drink coffee.

But is there any semantic difference between saying Ich mag Kaffee zu trinken and Ich trinke Kaffee gern?

It seems like they both generally translate to I like to drink coffee.

8

»Mögen« is a verb:

Ich mag Kaffee.
I like coffee.

Ich mag es, Kaffee zu trinken. I like to drink coffee.

But »gern« is an adverb:

Ich trinke gerne Kaffee
Verbatim: I gladly drink coffee.
(same pattern as in: I often drink coffee = Ich trinke oft Kaffee)

But you don't have an adverb in english that means the same like the german adverb »gern« So you have to build the sentence in a different way:

I like to drink coffee.

But if you translate this verbatim into German, then you get this:

Ich mag es, Kaffee zu trinken.

  • likely=wahrscheinlich, likewise=ebenso – Carsten S Feb 17 '17 at 16:28
  • @CarstenS: yes, you are right. I just tried to write an English word, that is an adverb and might be understood as an English version of the German adverb »gern«. I know that there is no such word, and whatever I would write, would be wrong. That is why I wrote the sentence But you don't have an adverb in english that means the same like the german adverb »gern«. – Hubert Schölnast Feb 17 '17 at 16:32
  • 2
    The adverb gladly is very close to a direct translation of gern - certainly in the sentence Ich trinke gerne Kaffee one would naturally translate it as "I gladly drink coffee"/"I drink coffee gladly". – David Hall Feb 17 '17 at 17:05
  • 1
    @DavidHall: Thank you. I corrected it in my answer – Hubert Schölnast Feb 17 '17 at 17:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.