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I've generally understood usage of da- words when complementing the personal pronoun.
But is usage of dafür correct in context of connecting two sentences?
Examples:

I go to the room for smoking a cigarette.
Ich gehe zum Zimmer dafür, eine Zigarette zu rauchen.

I go the supermarket for buying a bread.
Ich gehe zum Supermarkt dafür, ein Brot zu kaufen.

I want you to go there so you could buy milk for me.
Ich möchte, dass du dahin gehst dafür, so du kannst mir Brot zu kaufen.

Is this usage correct?

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    I reworded your third example. I'm afraid but word-for-word translation are generally not good. To make sure that answers are focussed on the actual question instead of addressing other issues, I replaced your translation of "I want you to go there" with an idiomatic German phrase. I didn't change the part that your question is about, i.e. "dafür" is still there. – Em1 Mar 16 '17 at 10:24
  • Danke dafür, Herr Em. Können Sie auf meine Frage antworten, bitte? Ich glaube dass Sie sind ein toller Specialist im deutscher Sprache! – ClassyPimp Mar 16 '17 at 10:44
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    I'm pretty sure your original sentences aren't well-formed English. They should be using an infinitive with "to". Then you could straightforwardly translate them into German using an infinitive with "um". – tofro Mar 16 '17 at 11:02
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    Or to make it more obvious, what @tofro is saying, it would be "in order to do sth" and any good dictionary will tell you that the German structure for this is "um etw zu machen". – Em1 Mar 16 '17 at 11:05
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    It can. Both "darauf" and "dafür" can be used to relate to something that is given in the next or previous clause. "Ich bin dafür, dass..." is a common expression. Your sentences, however, are typical examples for using "in order to". That being said, your last sentence is already different in English (it can be rephrased to "in order to", though), and as a matter of course, there are also variations in German. In that case "so dass", would be a good fit. Still, no "dafür" in any of these examples. – Em1 Mar 16 '17 at 12:32
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The pronominal adverb 'dafür' is not really used to 'connect' clauses in simple statements – that would rather be the job of words of the type Konjunktionen (conjunctions). In your examples, the correctly formed statements would be of the basic pattern:

Ich tue X, um Y zu tun. – I do X in order to do Y.

The dependent clauses here are of the type Infinitivsatz mit 'um zu', where 'um zu' is the conjunction, more specifically: 'infinitive conjunction' – Infinitivkonjunktion:

1) Ich gehe in das Zimmer, um eine Zigarette zu rauchen.

2) Ich gehe zum Supermarkt, um Brot zu kaufen.

3) Ich möchte, dass du dort hingehst, um mir Milch mitzubrigen.

You would only add 'dafür' here in order to explicitly justify or explain the reason of your action, answering the expressed or imagined/supposed question "Wofür (tust du das)?" meaning "What for (are you doing this)?":

Q: Wofür gehst du in dieses Zimmer?
A: Ich gehe dafür in das Zimmer, um eine Zigarette zu rauchen.

Q: Wofür gehst du zum Supermarkt?
A: Ich gehe dafür zum Supermarkt, um Brot zu kaufen.

Q: Wofür möchtest du, dass ich zum Supermarkt gehe?
A: Ich möchte, dass du dafür zum Supermarkt gehst, um Milch mitzubringen.

And even here the use of 'dafür' is not required grammatically. It is a matter of expression.

So, the use of 'dafür' here is not that of a conjunction connecting two clauses. Instead, 'dafür' has the role of a Korrelat. A Korrelat is a word in one clause that references – with a specific meaning – an object in a connected clause, or, like in the above examples, the whole connected clause.

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Apart from the wrong usages in English, the correct ones in German would be:

Ich gehe zum Zimmer dafür, eine Zigarette zu rauchen.

Ich gehe zum/ins Zimmer, um eine Zigarette zu rauchen.

Ich gehe zum Supermarkt dafür, ein Brot zu kaufen.

Ich gehe zum Supermarkt, um ein Brot zu kaufen.

Ich möchte, dass du dahin gehst dafür, so du kannst mir Brot zu kaufen.

Ich möchte, dass du dahin gehst, damit du mir ein Brot kaufen kannst.

  • Anyway, so welcome to our community. Note, however, that while your answer is correct, it'd be better if there were an explanation. We should focus on explaining an issue so that OP (and any future visitors) can understand what's going on, so that they can apply this in future on their own. – Em1 Mar 16 '17 at 13:28
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I go to the room for smoking a cigarette.
Ich gehe zum Zimmer dafür, eine Zigarette zu rauchen.

The German sentence is wrong. If you want to use the word dafür, you have to switch​ the sentences:

Ich möchte eine Zigarette rauchen. Dafür gehe ich zum Raucherzimmer.

In this sentence, dafür means in order to be able to do this.

The word dafür can also have many other meanings.

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