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Does that mean "Furnished apartment is highly appreciated"?

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  • Please edit your question to give us some detail to work with: 1) Do you have problem understanding the German phrase or finding an English translation? 2) What have you already understood? Why did a dictionary not help you? 3) What is the context? (Yes, we can guess, but we do not want to.) 4) What do you need this translation for? – Wrzlprmft Mar 25 '17 at 17:22
  • I have problem understanding the phrase. I know each words separately, but i just don't understand the phrase. It's from the passage in a german textbook. – Dennis Mar 25 '17 at 17:27
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    Then please edit your question to state that you are aiming to understand, describe how you understood the terms separately and what the textbook context is. We do not like to provide blunt translations but help you understand. And for this we need to know where to begin. – Wrzlprmft Mar 25 '17 at 17:49
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    Where do you get the "higly" from? – user unknown Mar 27 '17 at 1:37
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This is the core of it:

This phrase is used by people who are looking for a place to rent, say a room in a flat sharing, or a small apartment or so, typically students, or people who start working in another city and need a quick solution for living. They use this sentence in order to clarify that they would accept both an empty room (or appartment) and one that has furniture.

It is not to indicate a preference. It indicates that both is acceptable.

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