1

According to dictionaries sich über jdn./etw. beklagen means to complain about sb./sth.

I want to complain about myself, then how could I use?

Ich beklage mich über mich.

This is an unusual usage, but I want to know if it is a grammatically correct one.

  • I have (hopefully) clarified the question with the closing comment. – Tom Au Apr 18 '17 at 22:24
  • The strange apparence of this construction can be avoided by using a different phrase (also somewhat dated, but apparently still claiming its realm): Ich hadere mit mir. – guidot Apr 19 '17 at 6:59
7

Your example is grammatically correct.

Ich beklage mich über mich.

Über mich isn't a second accusative object but a prepositional object. The preposition über comes in two flavours with different meaning:

Wo ist Erwin? — Er beklagt sich gerade über uns über den Lärm.

Where is Erwin? — He's complaining above, about the noise.

über uns is über+dative, meaning "above us"

über den Lärm is über+accusative, meaning "about the noise"

  • I've for the first time heard "über uns" means "above us", I thought "über uns " means in english "about us". – DaF-Student Apr 3 '17 at 20:40
  • It can mean both. Uns can be both dative and accusative. Here it's dative and that has to be guessed from the other über, which is with accusative. Having both mean "about" has to be written as über uns und den Lärm. – Janka Apr 4 '17 at 0:04
2

Your sentence is correct.

Analysis of your sentence:

  • Ich
    subject
    a mandatory complement of the verb (telling us who is complaining)
    personal pronoun
    nominative case, singular, 1st person
  • beklage
    finit verb (telling us what is going on in this sentence)
    matching to the subject in number and person: singular, 1st person
    present tense
  • mich
    accusative object
    a mandatory complement of the verb (needed because beklagen is a reflexive verb. This mich is not telling anything new, it just again tells us who is complaining)
    reflexive pronoun
    matching to the subject in number and person: singular, 1st person
  • über mich
    prepositional object
    an optional complement of the verb (telling us about who the subject is complaining)
    • über
      preposition (telling us, that someone is saying something about somebody)
    • mich
      accusative object
      a mandatory complement of the preposition (telling us about who the subject is complaining)
      personal pronoun
      accusative case, singular, 1st person (there is no grammatical need for matching with the subject in number and person. It's matching only because of syntactical reasons, because source and target of complaint are equal.)

But if you want, you can also add »selbst« at the end of the sentence:

Ich beklage mich über mich selbst.

This additional word is then part of the prepositional object which then has three words: »über mich selbst«.

  • über mich selbst
    ...
    • selbst
      apposition
      an optional complement of the preposition (telling us, that the subject is complaining about him-self. But this information exists already in the previous word mich, so in fact it is redundant.)
      demonstrative pronoun (referring to both, the subject and to the accusative object inside the prepositional object. Because it is referring to two parts of speech that need to be the same, it only can be used if they really are equal, like in this sentence. You could not use it in »Hans beklagt sich über Anna selbst«, but you can use it in »Hans beklagt sich über sich selbst«)
-1

I want to complain about myself.

Word for word this translates easily into:

Ich habe Lust/das Bedürfnis zu beschweren über mich selbst.

To make that into a proper German sentence you add one word (mich) and move the verb to the end.

Ich habe Lust mich über mich selbst zu beschweren.

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