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Die Jugendministerin hat keine Programme für die sinnvolle Freizeitgestaltung der Schüler entwickeln können.

  • What exactly is the question here? Do you mean: "Why is the word können positioned at the end of the sentence, not elsewhere"? If so, where else would you put it? – Christian Geiselmann May 10 '17 at 15:44
  • yes, you get me . sorry I can't express myself so clearly – meowngu May 10 '17 at 16:01
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In some southern German dialects, people say

Die Jugendministerin hat keine Programme für die sinnvolle Freizeitgestaltung der Schüler entwickeln gekonnt.

The basic structure is

<Subjekt> hat <Infinitiv> gekonnt.

So, it's Perfekt tense of können, and this requires an infinitive of the action which someone can do.

There's another complication however. Standard German doesn't like this infinitive+participle construction. Instead, it's infinitive+infinitive.

<Subjekt> hat <Infinitiv> können.

This Ersatzinfinitiv applies to all modal verbs (dürfen, können, mögen, müssen, sollen und wollen) and the verbs brauchen, lassen, sehen, and sometimes hören, fühlen, helfen.

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    You could even continue this structure by adding more modal verbs: "Die Ministerin hat keine Programme für sinnvolle Freizeitgestaltung der Schüler entwickeln können sollen." This is of course not a sentence to be used in standard situations. However, in some satirical comment it could well appear, and would be well-formed there. – Christian Geiselmann May 10 '17 at 15:47

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