1

I see a sentence in a book and can't understand the Korean translation. "Als Kohl kurz zu Waigel blickt, sieht er wie dieser einen silbernen Löffel in seine Brusttasche steckt". In English how is this 'wie' translated? In 'sieht er wie', 'er' means Kohl, isn't it? And As I understand, 'wie' above should be a subject word meaning Waigel. Someone please explain this to me.

  • 2
    wie cannot be a subject. – Carsten S Jun 25 '17 at 14:41
3

Als Kohl kurz zu Waigel blickt, sieht er wie dieser einen silbernen Löffel in seine Brusttasche steckt

"wie" in this sentence means "how". Note, however, that you would not translate the entire sentence with "how" in English: In German, a perception of some activity can be described the same way as in English:

I see you write a message. = Ich sehe dich eine Nachricht schreiben.

There is, however, an alternative construction that has the same meaning and is just as commonly used in German:

Ich sehe, wie du eine Nachricht schreibst.

Literally, this translates to something like

I see how you are writing a message.

But, as I said, it would rather not be expressed like that in English.

Therefore, the sentence in question describes Kohl watching Waigel take a silver spoon:

Als Kohl kurz zu Waigel blickt, sieht er, wie dieser einen silbernen Löffel in seine Brusttasche steckt.

and

Als Kohl kurz zu Waigel blickt, sieht er diesen einen silbernen Löffel in seine Brusttasche stecken.

are synonymous.

The word referring to Waigel in that text actually is "dieser". Literally, it just means "this one" (referring to the most recently named possible subject), but depending on the language, a different term may be chosen (e.g., I would write "the latter" in English).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.