1

This book begins with these lines:

Aristoteles ist einer der bedeutendsten europäischen Denker und einer der großen Kirchenvater des menschlichen Geistes. Der sowohl für die Philosophie als auch für die Einzelwissenschaften überragende Forscher und Lehrer prägt keineswegs nur das Abendland.

As far as I can tell, der here is the definite article of Forscher and Lehrer, both masculine nouns.

If I am correct in assuming this much about der, why is it then separated from its noun(s) by sowohl für die Philosophie als auch für die Einzelwissenschaften; and why isn't the whole sentence written like this:

Der überragende Forscher und Lehrer, sowohl für die Philosophie als auch für die Einzelwissenschaften, prägt keineswegs nur das Abendland.

Does separating the noun from its definite article sound better in German or the reasons for doing so are other than purely euphonic?

  • 1
    The original sentence is already a bit weird - "für die Philosophie überragend" doesn't make a lot of sense to me. "Für die Philosophie [bedeutend|überragend wichtig|prägend]" would make a lot more sense. The preposition "für" and "überragen" don't fit at all. – tofro Jul 8 '17 at 11:01
  • The Der refers to the Aristoteles of the previous sentence. The difference between your version and the one of the book are small and in this very sentence only in emphasis. I like the books version more, while it sounds abit more complicated. I think your version should be the more common one, at least in spoken german. – ikadfoanhfda Jul 8 '17 at 11:39
  • 1
    @ikadfoanhfda Then, if der refers to Aristotle, it is a relative pronoun, not a definite article. Logically at least, that would be even stranger than my own version, with der as a definite article. – ΥΣΕΡ26328 Jul 8 '17 at 11:46
  • @ikadfoanhfda No. The article refers to Forscher – tofro Jul 8 '17 at 16:26
3

For the purpose of explaining the sentence structure, let us simplify the original sentence and remove the irrelevant words in parenthesis:

Der (sowohl) für die Philosophie (als auch für die Einzelwissenschaften) überragende Forscher (und Lehrer) prägt keineswegs nur das Abendland.

So, we have

Der für die Philosophie überragende Forscher prägt keineswegs nur das Abendland.

As you have altready noticed, der is the definite article of Forscher and überragend, meaning formidable, is an adjective. So, we have the basic structure "Der überragende Forscher ...".

However, the author wants to specify for whom Aristotele is formidable. In German, you can add the specification attributively and say für die Philosophie überragend. In summary, we have "Der für die Philosophie überragende Forscher ...". That's it.


Your suggestion, which after simplification reads

Der überragende Forscher, für die Philosophie, prägt keineswegs nur das Abendland.

is not correct, neither contentwise nor grammatically. Regarding the content, the attribute für die Philosophie specifies Forscher instead of überragend. Regarding grammar, a verb is missing in the relative clause. To keep the definite article close to the noun, you could say something like

Der Forscher, der für die Philosophie überragend ist, prägt keineswegs nur das Abendland.

Here, der für die Philosophie überragend ist is a proper relative clause. Or you can use the apposition für die Philosophie überragend and say something like

Der Forscher, für die Philosophie überragend, prägt keineswegs nur das Abendland.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.