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I am thinking to name my company Spitz for a few reasons. It is a film company (producing videos for other companies and also long/short fiction films). However, I read that spitz is also a slang for horny. Is that so? Is it really used as a sexual expression in Germany? I don’t want my company to be associated with porn movies.

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    Lakritz macht spitz. Pizza macht spitza – tofro Aug 4 '17 at 6:43
  • You should add information on the type of business you plan to do with that company. (See answer below.) – Christian Geiselmann Aug 4 '17 at 9:23
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    "horny" is already slang. – user253751 Aug 4 '17 at 10:48
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    Note, that in Austria, there already is a very well known company named Spitz. It is named after Salomon Spitz who founded this company in 1857. – Hubert Schölnast Aug 4 '17 at 15:01
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I find this a difficult question.

As many commenters said, spitz may sometimes be used for something like horny (eager for sexual activities involving other humans), but on the other hand, at least in my own social environment (German middle class so to say, raised in Southern Germany, now living predominantly in the North) the term is rarely used for that purpose, to the effect that, yes, if you explicitely ask for it, then people will remember this as a marginal meaning; or if you are in a group of lads where sexual puns are the common form of communication - okay but then literally everything is going to be interpreted sexually. Whilst in everyday situations I would rather not see a regular association with sexuality.

In other words: if I saw a company name "Spitz" I would not feel triggered for sexual puns or allusions.

But of course, it also depends on the type of business you want to do.

  • Opening a bakery "Bäckerei Spitz" would not be a problem at all (as this could be simply the family name, and moreover, many products could be associated such as croissants etc.).

  • Opening a dating website named "Spitz" would clearly be understood as sexual. Not a good idea, unless it is intended.

  • Opening a civil engineering consultancy "Ingenieurbüro Spitz" - again no problem. Likewise "Spitz Graphik-Design" and "Spitz Webdesign".

  • Opening a petroleum rafinery "Spitz Petrol" - again no problem.

  • Opening an agriculture company focusing on growing and selling asparagus (e.g. "Spitz Spargel") - even a good idea: sounds good, fits the product, and by the way, asparagus is anyway sometimes used for mild sexual allusions [1]; but this would still not be the first thing to come to your mind when facing such a company name. "Spargelspitzen" is the common term for asparagus tips (the most delicate part of the sprout), so: positive associations wherever you look!


Addition, as now the purpose of the company is reveiled (film production):

  • Let's try some possible company names: "Spitz Filmproduktion", "Spitz Werbefilme*, "Spitz Productions", "Filmstudio Spitz", "Spitz Cinematography"... for me all those sound quite innocent. I personally would not be suspicious of porn production. It sounds just like a (little bit boring) family name. (I would have a tongue in the cheek with "Filmstudio Brüstle" or "Filmstudio Zapf").

1) See e.g. the popular song "Veronika, der Lenz ist da"

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    I, as someone who lived in Austria for over a decade, have a bit different view: There, 'Spitz' will very much be taken for its sexual meaning right away, but that's not considered bad in Austria. – Crowley Astray Aug 4 '17 at 10:32
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Ja. Es ist auch eine Form (spitz vs. rund) und, als Substantiv, Eien Hundesorte (der Spitz).

Spitz und Scharf werden aber im übertragenen Sinne auch für Lüste jenseits des Sexuellen benutzt, also man kann spitz auf ein Eis sein.

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  • Tks for the answer... but i dont speak German. I put your answer on google translator... but im afraid it didnt make much sense. Could you please explain in english? Thanks again – Dany Aug 4 '17 at 3:40
  • @Dany he says that it's a common term for beeing horny and that it also would be used for "hot"/strong desire in other ways, his example beeing having "hot"/strong desire for ice cream. I can confirm that it's a common slang term, but never heard it used for others then sexual desires. The slang is not exclusive used/known by kids btw. Therefore I recommand to not use this as company name if you don't want to sell sex toys ;-) Edit: He also mentions two other meanings for this word, a specific shape and a special kind of dog. – ikadfoanhfda Aug 4 '17 at 3:46
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    Thank you! Im sad to hear that!! Sharp has evrything to do with my company, and spitz sound good! But since i dont want that relation with sexual behavior... i ll take your advice @ikadfoanhfda – Dany Aug 4 '17 at 3:52
  • @Dany I have to disagree with the answers here. The term "spitz" was used for "horny" in German, yes, but that is already a few decades back. Nowadays, people don't really use it anymore, if someone does he will get a "the 90s/80s/... called, they want you to come back"-joke for it. As long as you don't point out the sexual meaning yourself, most people will ignore or not even realize it. – Dirk Aug 4 '17 at 9:25
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    @Polygnome: Dann bist Du vielleicht auch ohne konkrete Erfahrung in der Lage, die Transferleistung "spitz/scharf auf jemand/etwas sein" sein vom sexuellen in den kulinarischen Bereich zu erbringen. – user unknown Aug 4 '17 at 13:15
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The most common usage of spitz is as the opposite meaning of round. For example: Etwas ist spitz oder spitz zulaufend (domething has a pointed edge).

Another use is to refer to the dog breed of that name ("Spitz").

Nowadays the term spitz is not anymore in common use for sexual meanings. If you use it that way, many people would find it rather old language style or you have to make explicit use, e.g. Spitz toys when selling sex toys ...

So feel free to use it as a company name.

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