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I'd want to know how robbers announce an assault in Germany. For example, expressions like "this is a holdup/stick-up/robbery!", as well as "give me the money and no one gets hurt" and others.

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    Do you want to become an internationally known bandit? :D
    – Devon
    Aug 13, 2017 at 6:56
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    I'd like to point out that thieves ("Diebe") typically don't announce their intentions; robbers ("Räuber") do. Thieves go about their nefarious work as stealthily as possible.
    – tink
    Aug 13, 2017 at 9:13
  • What have you found so far, using dictionaries? Why isn't this sufficient? Until showing own research, I vote to close this question. Aug 13, 2017 at 15:40
  • This is tricky. In the past, you had to shout something unintelligible, just very loud. Then, witnesses would tell you spoke mit südländischem Akzent, which was practical in case you were from, let's say, Stockholm.
    – Janka
    Aug 13, 2017 at 16:18
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    A modern classic: Geld her Handy her Aug 13, 2017 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

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One typical phrase for a bank robbery is:

Hände hoch! Das ist ein Überfall! (Hands up! This is a robbery!)

This well-known phrase frequently appears in literature.

A classic follow-up would be:

Wenn Sie genau tun was ich sage, wird niemand verletzt. (If you do exactly as I say, nobody will get hurt.)

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One of the calls to get money from people, typically at gun-point:

Geld oder Leben!
(Stand and deliver!)

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    Klingt nach 50er-Jahre und Heinz Rühmann. Aug 13, 2017 at 15:41
  • Die englische Entsprechung wäre doch ganz ähnlich Your money or your life!. Aug 13, 2017 at 18:40
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    @userunknown: Und warum nicht nach Mantel und Degen?
    – Pollitzer
    Aug 13, 2017 at 19:57
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    Das ist nicht mein Punkt. Mein Punkt ist, dass es reichlich verstaubt klingt. Heute sagt kein Räuber mehr "Geld oder Leben", wage ich zu behaupten. Aug 14, 2017 at 1:15
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    Seit wann sagt man im Deutschen "Mein Punkt ist, ..."?
    – tink
    Aug 14, 2017 at 10:31

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