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I read a sentence

Mein Gott - was soll aus Deutschland werden

from: http://www.spiegel.de/spiegel/print/d-43366453.html

I guess the meaning is "My God, what will Germany become?". My question is: why do we have a "aus" here? Does it give any additional meaning here? Is the sentence different from "was soll Deutschland werden"?

What is the declarative sentence form(not question form)? "Aus Deutschland wird eine gute Land." ?

Here is another more complicated and special example(from "Versionkontrolle mit Git"):

Bei der normalen Anwendung von git clone werden aus den lokalen Entwicklungszweigen des Original-Repository, die in refs/heads/ gespeichert sind, die entfernten TrackingZweige im neuen Klon unter refs/remotes/.

6

The meaning of your example is closer to

What will become of Germany?

instead of

What will Germany become?

Using "aus" puts emphasis on the fact that Germany will evolve/develop into something; its meaning is somewhat closer to "What will Germany evolve into?" than it is to "What will it become?"

Quote from the duden.de article about "aus":

zur Angabe eines früheren Entwicklungsstadiums in Verbindung mit Verben, die ein Werden bezeichnen. Beispiele:
- aus den Raupen entwickeln sich Schmetterlinge
- aus seiner Tochter wurde eine tüchtige Ärztin

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    Using "aus" puts emphasis on the fact that Germany will evolve/develop starting from the existing state into another state. – Hubert Schölnast Aug 23 '17 at 12:22
  • What is the declarative sentence form(not question form)? "Aus Deutschland wird eine gute Land." ? – YNG Aug 23 '17 at 14:40
  • "Aus Deutschland wird ein gutes Land" - although that sounds kinda weird, much like "Germany will become a good country" in english would. What is it you're trying to say? – PixelMaster Aug 24 '17 at 9:38
  • @PixelMaster, I am confused about the subject of the sentence which in this case is in fact a phrase "Aus Deutschland". I would normally expect a noun, since it is rare to use "Zu Hause", "Auf der Strasse", .. etc as subjects of sentences. – YNG Aug 24 '17 at 17:36
  • I'm still not entirely sure what you mean, but the sentence "Deutschland wird ein gutes Land" (without "aus") is also correct, albeit weird. Adding "aus" simply gives additional information here. "Zu Hause" on the other hand belongs together and neither of the words can be omitted without rendering the sentence invalid. – PixelMaster Aug 25 '17 at 11:49
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I guess the problem simply lies in the different meanings, especially since 1 and 2 also may be combined.

1) become (as in example 1 and 2). The starting state of the object becoming something is typically referred to by "aus".
2) indicator for future tense (Ich werde reisen, I will travel)
3) indicator for passive perfect (Ich werde geküsst, I get kissed)
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    There is no passive in "werden aus den lokalen x die entfernten x" or in any of the other examples – tofro Aug 23 '17 at 12:18

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