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The article “Generationsfrage Alkoholkonsum. Auf dem Weg zum Olymp.” from taz.de talks about alcohol consumption among older people. In the below paragraph the author describes his visit to the family doctor:

Der Autor selbst, der im Jahr 2020 mit 52 Jahren die Reihen der Alterssuffkis aufstocken wird, erinnert sich noch gut an seinen letzten Hausarztbesuch, bei dem ihm, schon in der Tür stehend, noch angenehm moralfrei nachgerufen wurde: „Sie trinken gern mal einen – das sieht man an ihrem Blutbild.“ Darauf fiel mir nichts ein als ein bedröppeltes „Ja“, was wohl schon auf beginnende Demenz hinweist.

I could not find the word Alterssuffkis or Suffkis in any of the dictionaries I use. From the context, Alterssuffkis seems to meen old drinker. Perhaps, Suffkis is derived from der Suff, meaning boozing.

So, is Alterssuffkis a correct German word or a misspelled one?

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"Suffki" is in fact derived from the noun "Suff" or the verb "saufen", using a suffix to construct a new noun, meaning "boozer". The only parallel construction coming to my mind is "Knacki" (Con, Jailbird) derived from "verknacken" / "knacken". But there, the root already contains a "k", so the suffix is simply "i"; with "Suffki", i can't explain why there's a "k" between root and suffix. Maybe it should be a shortcut for "Suffkopp" or something like that... The derivation is similar to "Ossi" / "Wessi", deriving from "Ostdeutscher" / "Westdeutscher".

It seems to be specific for the Berlin dialect; at least, the "taz" used it in 1989 already, as cited by the Spiegel, for example. You'll find it rarely in books, too. So, you may say it's correct german, but to me, it's clearly colloquial language.

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    Ich nehme an, dass die Endung scherzhaft dem Russischen oder ähnlichem nachempfunden ist. – Carsten S Aug 24 '17 at 20:53

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