1

I just noticed that there are two words which mean bookstore: der Buchladen and die Buchhandlung. Which of these two words is preferable? I'm using this in the context of "Ich gehe in die Buchhandlung (den Buchladen)."

7

In cases like yours, Google Ngrams gives you a good start.

You can clearly see that Buchhandlung is by far the most frequently used variety to describe stores selling books.

While in a more colloquial context a "Buch-" or "Bücherladen" will be both used and understood, "Buchhandlung" is correct in every register.

|improve this answer|||||
6

Buchladen is the word that I would use in most cases, while Buchhandlung sounds more technical to me. Some of the other answers here let me suspect that there are regional differences, I am from Berlin.

As an example, I have found a list of zehn tolle Buchläden in Berlin. There you see both words being used and also book stores having Buchhandlung or Buchladen in their name.

Looking at some other examples, it seems that Buchladen evokes the image of a smaller store.

Addendum: Buchladen in München, Buchläden in Wien.

|improve this answer|||||
4

Depends also on the type of bookstore. In every university town one can find a Universitätsbuchhandlung. Universitätsbuchladen would just sound terribly wrong. On the other hand, you can find here or there a feministic Frauenbuchladen. Frauenbuchhandlung would at least be uncommon.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Würde es falsch oder nur ungewöhnlich klingen? Kann man das am Klang unterscheiden? – user unknown Sep 17 '17 at 19:18
  • Nicht am klang, aber es gibt doch eine gewisse Gewöhnung an Sprachrichtigkeit, oder? – scienceponder Sep 18 '17 at 0:12
  • 1
    Universitätsbuchladen klingt für mich ungewohnt, aber nicht falsch. Nach welcher Regel sollte es falsch sein? Frauenbuchhandlg. vs. -laden: books.google.com/ngrams/… – user unknown Sep 18 '17 at 7:40
  • Regel gibt es da keine. Aber richtig und falsch ergeben sich in der Sprache nun mal aus Konventionen, und die basieren letztendlich auf der Gewohnheit der Mehrheit. – scienceponder Sep 18 '17 at 10:41
  • Nein. Die Gewohnheit der Mehrheit ist die Konvention, daraus ergibt sich kein richtig und falsch. Die dt. Sprache erlaubt dem Sprecher/Schreiber spontane Wortbildungen; die sind dann ungewöhnlich aber nicht falsch. – user unknown Sep 19 '17 at 9:21
2

Buchhandung is definitive preferable. Buchladen is nowhere near as idiomatic.

Laden is a colloquial term and you can make up all kind of -läden. People even call the place you can get doner kebab Dönerladen. Laden can also carry negative connotations: A Saftladen, for instance, is not a place where you can buy juice, but used to refer to any institution that provides bad service or bad products or is otherwise just not recommendable.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    I can't think of even one case where I might have heard "Buchgeschäft". My first thought on hearing "Buchgeschäft" would be akin to "book business" - not the store, but the line of work. – Stephie Sep 16 '17 at 20:48
  • 1
    As a native speaker of German, I would only use Buchhandlung. – Uwe Sep 17 '17 at 9:28
  • @stephie Ja, ihr habt wohl recht. „Buchgeschäft“ ist standardsprachlich wirklich komisch. Ich habe mich hier von einem Regionalismus wohl etwas verleiten lassen. – idmean Sep 17 '17 at 9:35
0

Buchladen? A Laden for books? No, no! Laden sounds like wild consumerism, but books that's the true, the beautiful and the good.

A Handlung on the other hand clearly feels like competence and seriousness. A book that is something of importance by itself, something that most be respected and honoured unlike eggs and cloths and therefore needs a proper Handlung instead of a Laden! It's a Kulturgut.

I clearly exaggerate here, but I belive that this idea somehow unspoken is in the mind of the average german or at least many germans. You can use Buchladen or idmean's Buchgeschäft e.g. in novels if you don't want to use Buchhandlung over and over again but in everyday German Buchhandlung is the common used word.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Handlung on its own means "action". How does "book action" make sense as a compound word? Or am I wrong to treat this word as a compound noun? – ktm5124 Sep 17 '17 at 0:58
  • 2
    @ktm5124 It's indeed a compund word. It's just that Handlung as noun can mean store duden.de/rechtschreibung/Handlung#Bedeutung3 – ikadfoanhfda Sep 17 '17 at 1:01
  • Ich verstehe. Danke! – ktm5124 Sep 17 '17 at 1:02
  • 2
    Ich widerspreche Ihrer Begründung, weil sie sich nicht verallgemeinern lässt. Ihrer Argumentation zufolge hörte sich ein Kaufmannsladen nach wildem Konsum an, wohingegen Kaufmannshandlung Kompetenz und Seriosität austrahlte und viele Durchschnittsdeutsche deshalb letzteres bevorzugen würden. Im zweiten Absatz schätzen Sie Eier und Kleidung herab, vermutlich, weil man sie eher im Laden kaufe? Getränke würde ich auf derselben Wertschätzungsstufe einordnen. Doch wie begründen sie dann, dass man eher Getränkehandel statt Getränkeladen sagt? – Björn Friedrich Sep 17 '17 at 9:20
  • 2
    This is clearly wrong. – Carsten S Sep 17 '17 at 10:50

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.