0

1) Als sie die neue Stelle bekommen hat, hat sie eine Party mit ihren Freunden gemacht.

2) Als sie die neue Stelle bekommen hat, hat sie mit ihren Freunden eine Party gemacht

I have this question because I saw a sentence in my textbook:

Als er einen Sprachkurs am Goethe-Institut besucht hat, hat er Deutsch gelernt.

This seemed to imply that the correct sentence structure should be [subject] [object][time/manner/place]

But then I saw in the answer sheet that the first sentence was correct. That made me very confused.

  • Both are correct. If the answer sheet implies 2) is incorrect, that answer sheet is worthless. It's in fact the more common version. – Janka Oct 29 '17 at 14:38
  • 9
    None is correct. Borh need an article to "neue Stelle". – harper Oct 29 '17 at 14:47
  • 4
    This is an aside, but note that the second construction removes certain ambiguities. To see this, compare: 'Der Polizist hat mit verbundenen Augen den Räuber verhaftet.' 'Der Polizist hat den Räuber mit verbundenen Augen verhaftet.' – The first sentence states that the the policeman was blindfolded when he arrested the robber. The second sentence can have that meaning too, but it can also mean that the policeman arrested a blindfolded robber. – MarkOxford Oct 29 '17 at 17:45
  • Even if both are correct after adding the missing article, there is room for improvement: two hat in succession as well as the expression Party machen (colloquially acceptable, but I would not recommended it for writing). – guidot Oct 30 '17 at 10:52
  • One of the "hat"s must be a "hatte", because not both half sentences happen at the same time (I think). To change the first "hat" makes more sense. – Ernest Bredar Apr 7 at 13:17
4

There's an article missing in the first part of your sentence

Als sie die neue Stelle bekommen hat, hat sie eine Party mit ihren Freunden gemacht.

oder

Als sie eine neue Stelle bekommen hat, hat sie eine Party mit ihren Freunden gemacht.

However, it is possible to say both sentences. Your textbook probably only gave one possible answer, but German allows you to throw your sentence structure around, often based on what you want to emphasize.

So yes, adding the missing article, this is also correct.

Als sie die/eine neue Stelle bekommen hat, hat sie mit ihren Freunden eine Party gemacht.

"Die Stelle" in this context would mean that she was looking forward to a particular job offer and that she succeeded in getting hired.

"Eine Stelle" means rather that she got any job, perhaps after searching for a long period of time.

2

Ich fühle, dass beide gut sind. Es kommt darauf an, was man stärker betonen wollte: die Party, oder mit Freunden.

Ansonst braucht man ein "die" vor der neuen Stelle: "... die neue Stelle ...".

  • 1
    Das Gefühl trügt hier, ohne ein "die" vor der neuen Stelle sind beide Sätze nicht gut. – Uwe Nov 1 '17 at 20:38
1

Although infinitezero gave a correct answer, I want to provide some further information on the order of German sentences:

When you want to decide on the order of a German (just like in an English) sentence, you can ask yourself: To what question would this be the answer?

To make this more clear, let us look at the second part of your sentence (I replaced gemacht with gefeiert):

Sie hat eine Party mit ihren Freunden gefeiert.

I will provide some examples of questions and aswers, with the cursive word being the emphasized one:

Wer hat eine Party mit ihren Freunden gefeiert?
Sie hat eine Party mit ihren Freunden gefeiert.

Mit wem hat sie eine Party gefeiert?
Mit ihren Freunden hat sie eine Party gefeiert.

Was hat sie mit ihren Freunden gefeiert?
Eine Party hat sie mit ihren Freunden gefeiert.

Was hat sie mit der Party mit ihren Freunden gemacht?
Gefeiert hat sie die Party mit ihren Freunden.

Note that the last example is a bit dumb, no one would ask this, obviously.

If we generalize this to more 'complex' sentences like yours above, the questions might get more complex (and confusing) as well:

Wann hat sie was mit ihren Freunden gemacht?
Als sie eine neue Stelle bekommen hat, hat sie eine Party mit ihren Freunden gefeiert.

Wann hat sie mit wem eine Party gefeiert?
Als sie eine neue Stelle bekommen hat, hat sie mit ihren Freunden eine Party gefeiert.

Mit wem hat wer was wann gemacht?
Mit ihren Freunden hat sie eine Party gefeiert, als sie eine neue Stelle bekam.

The questions are not uniquely identified. There might be various questions asked that require the same answer. The examples were only given to visualize my point.

If this went a bit too deep, you don't need to find the exact question to every sentence. What you should take from my answer is that the order of words in a German sentence is very flexible, just like it is in English. There are few combinations for which you can't find a proper question like I did above. So if you are writing a sentence just quickly think about what should be emphasized in the sentence, what is the most important point. Then add the rest of information in order of importance.

I hope this didn't get too confusing, please come back at me if you have questions regarding my answer.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.