1

Die Frau des Kritikers war allein zu Haus, in der massiven Hütte am Zürichsee, die nur über einen Privatweg zu erreichen war und die deshalb die benötigte Ungestörtheit während eines Kurzurlaubs versprach.

Short Stories in German: New Penguin Parallel Texts (p. 2). Penguin Books Ltd. Kindle Edition.

I am self learning German. What is the use of bold die in the above sentence? With my limited knowledge I haven't yet noticed both definite and indefinite articles coming together like above.

  • 1
    "... in the massive hut at the Zürichsee, that was only reachable through a private road and ...". "Die" is not just an article. – Rudy Velthuis Oct 30 '17 at 21:34
12

In this instance, die is a relative pronoun ('that'/'which' in English), not an article -- and so is the die before deshalb later in the sentence. The two clauses 'die nur über einen Privatweg zu erreichen war' and 'die deshalb die benötigte Ungestörtheit während eines Kurzurlaubs versprach' are both relative clauses that provide more information about the Hütte.

4

Let's boil down the sentence to what is essential for your question:

Sie war in der Hütte, die über einen Weg zu erreichen war.
She was in the hut, which could be reached via a path.

In this sentence, the word »die« is a relative pronoun, referring to the noun »Hütte«.


The word »die« can appear in three different functions:

  1. Article
    »Die« is the defined singular article for female nouns in nominative and in accusative case, and it is the plural article for all nouns in the same cases:

    Singular, nominative case: Die Gabel glänzt.
    Singular, accusative case: Ich sehe die Gabel.
    Plural, nominative case: Die Männer stehen.
    Plural, accusative case: Ich sehe die Männer.

  2. Relative pronoun
    »Die« can be used as a relative pronoun that refers to a female noun in nominative or in accusative case if it is a singular noun. It also can be uses as a relative pronoun that refers to a plural noun of any gender in the same cases:

    Singular, nominative case: Die Gabel, die am Tisch liegt, glänzt.
    Singular, accusative case: Ich sehe eine Gabel, die am Tisch liegt.
    Plural, nominative case: Drei Männer, die im Wald stehen, singen.
    Plural, accusative case: Ich sehe drei Männer, die im Wald stehen.

    Without changing the meaning, you can replace the relative pronoun »die« by »welche« (both versions are correct, often used and of good style):

    Die Gabel, welche am Tisch liegt, glänzt.
    Ich sehe eine Gabel, welche am Tisch liegt.
    Drei Männer, welche im Wald stehen, singen.
    Ich sehe drei Männer, welche im Wald stehen.

  3. Personal pronoun
    You will find »die« also used as a personal pronoun, but it is considered to be not very polite. You can replace »die« by »sie« which makes the sentence more polite. And again: feminine singular and any plural in nominative and accusative case:

    Singular, nominative case: Kennst du Frau Meier? Die trägt immer einen Schal.
    Singular, accusative case: Wo ist Gabi? Ich kann die nicht sehen.
    Plural, nominative case: Kennst du diese Männer? Die waren gestern bei mir.
    Plural, accusative case: Kennst du diese Männer? Ich sehe die jeden Tag.

    And here the more polite versions:

    Sie trägt immer einen Schal.
    Ich kann sie nicht sehen.
    Sie waren gestern bei mir.
    Ich sehe sie jeden Tag.

0

As mentioned earlier, this is a relative pronoun to emphasize the person or something. For example:

Das ist die Frau, die mir geholfen hat.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.