3

I undersand the use of the infinitive as a noun in instances like "Beim Essen hat sie mir gesagt, dass wir kein Geld mehr haben" or "Nach Verlassen des Raumes geben Sie bitte den Schlüssel ab". But in sentences like:

  • Das Züchten von genmanipuliertem Mais wird kontrovers diskutiert.
  • Er hat uns zum Essen eingeladen.
  • Zum Schwimmen sind wir nie gekommen.

Why is the infinitive used as a noun, instead of a noun or a simple zu + infinitive? Would the following sentences be incorrect, and if so, why?

  • Die Zucht von genmanipuliertem Mais wird kontrovers diskutiert.
  • Er hat uns zu essen eingeladen.
  • Wir sind nie zu schwimmen gekommen.

Also, in sentences like "Es gibt nichts zu essen." or "Er hatte keine Zeit, das Buch zu lesen." why can't the infinitive be used as a noun? Is there a specific rule or idiomatic reason?

I looked up nominalized infinitive on the internet and in my grammar books, but there was nothing specific on why the infinitive is used as a noun in some cases rather than others.

2

Die Zucht von genmanipuliertem Mais wird kontrovers diskutiert.

Das Züchten and die Zucht are related, but they aren't the same word. The first is the nominalization of the verb züchten, while the second was an actual noun from the beginning.


Er hat uns zu essen eingeladen.

Er hat uns zum Essen eingeladen. (nominalized infinitive)

Er hat uns eingeladen, zu essen. (infinitive clause)

Er hat uns eingeladen, dass wir essen. (object clause)

Here word order is important. Infinitive clauses are a shortcut variant of object clauses, so you have to finish the main clause first before you can add another action as an object to the main clause verb.

The nominalized infinitive in contrary drops nicely into the main clause as the English gerund (which German lacks) would. That's why German speakers love them so much.


Wir sind nie zu schwimmen gekommen.

Wir sind nie zum Schwimmen gekommen. (nominalized infinitive)

Wir sind nie dazu gekommen, zu schwimmen. (infinitive clause)

Wir sind nie dazu gekommen, dass wir schwimmen. (object clause)

Here's another complication. The phrase zu etwas kommen requires a zu. This is different from einladen, where the zu is optional. That's why we have the pointing finger dazu in the main clause. And because the infinitive clause is a shortcut for the object clause, the main clause stays the same even though the infinitive clause has that required zu.

(You may use the pointing finger dazu in the einladen example, too. It's optional there, though.)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.