0

I saw in my german textbook a sentence

"Und wer den neuen Tatort am Sonntag nicht gesehen hat, findet ihn danach noch sieben Tage lang im internet: in der ARD-Mediathek."

My question is: what does the "ihn" in the above sentence refer to? Does it refer to "den neuen Tatort"? Or does it refer to the "wer" just like the "ich" in "wenn ich Zeit habe, sehe ich Filme"?

Another question is: past tense is used in the first part of the sentence (hat gesehen), then shouldn't past tense be used in the second part of the sentence as well? So it should be "hat gefunden" instead of "findet"?

  • 2
    To part 1 of your question: "ihn" refers to "den neuen Tatort". – IQV Dec 6 '17 at 8:29
  • "then shouldn't past tense be used in the second part of the sentence as well?" No. Why should it be? – Eller Dec 6 '17 at 10:23
4

I actually don't understand your confusion here.

There is nothing in your examples that works differently as it does in English:

And who didn't watch the 'Tatort' on Sunday can find it in the internet for seven days.

If you are unsure in the translation of "ihn" because of different word genders in the languages, just try out all three accusative objects: him/her/it

What could the sense of the sentence be if "ihn" refers to "wer"? He finds himself in the internet?

To use "hat ... gefunden", so perfect, in the second part, you need past perfect in the first part (see also this recent post).

Und wer den neuen Tatort am Sonntag nicht gesehen hatte, hat ihn danach noch sieben Tage lang im internet gefunden: in der ARD-Mediathek.

I think your questions are answered directly by the context. If you have problems understanding the meaning of the sentence, please specify this again.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.