2

I have recently seen an exercise where I need to specify which verb to put in the sentence. The sentence was ,, Hast du meine Sonnenbrille.......? Dann hättest du mir eine neue kaufen können. " I was hesitant between "gebrauchen" and "verbrauchen" and "aufgebrauchen". So can anyone please explain to me the differences between those meanings?

1
  • 1
    What does the dictionary say? Jan 3 '18 at 19:21
1

Brauchen has two distinct meanings, to need, and to use:

Hast du meine Sonnenbrille gebraucht? Dann hättest du mir eine neue kaufen können.

There are two ways to interpret it:

Did you need my sunglasses? You could have bought me new ones, then.

Did you use my sunglasses? You could have bought me new ones, then.

Huh? Neither of these makes sense, because neither needing nor using sunglasses will consume them. It's a tool, it stays intact after being used. No need to buy a new one.

(Northern German speakers prefer the verb benutzen for the latter case.)


Knowing that, we come to the core of the question: What's the difference between brauchen and verbrauchen/aufbrauchen?

Let's not use a tool but consumable supplies, e.g. der Kaffee (coffee):

Hast du meinen Kaffee gebraucht? Dann hättest du mir neuen kaufen können.

Did you need/use my coffee? You could have bought me new (coffee), then.

The first sentence makes it clear someone needed/used your coffee, but it doesn't specify the amount. Most likely there's still coffee there. You are picky about your coffee supplies, ordering to buy a replacement for the slightest missing amount.

Hast du meinen Kaffee verbraucht/aufgebraucht? Dann hättest du mir neuen kaufen können.

Did you consume all my coffee? You could have bought me new (coffee), then.

The first sentence makes it clear someone consumed all of your coffee supplies.

Also note you cannot use aufbrauchen or verbrauchen for the sunglasses of your original example because they aren't consumable supplies. But that's the very reason the second sentence makes no sense for sunglasses either.


The difference between verbrauchen and aufbrauchen is more subtle.

Dieses Auto verbraucht viel Benzin.

This car consumes a lot of gasoline.

You cannot use aufbrauchen here, because it always means to consume all, while verbrauchen can also mean to consume.

3

Gegenstände, die durch ihre normale Benutzung weniger werden, kann man verbrauchen, also in ihrer Menge verringern oder aufbrauchen, also vollständig konsumieren.

  • Ich habe das ganze Mehl aufgebraucht, kannst du bitte neues kaufen? Hier kann auch verbrauchen verwendet werden.
  • Mein Auto verbraucht 10 Liter Sprit auf 100km. Hier kann man nicht aufgebrauchen verwenden, da die Benzinverbrennung ein kontinuierlicher Vorgang ist und in der Regel nach 100km noch Benzin da ist.

Gegenstände die wie Sonnenbrille, die auch durch die reguläre Benutzung erhalten bleiben, werden gebraucht und niemals verbraucht oder aufgebraucht. Das gilt auch, wenn der Gegenstand bei einem Gebrauch zerstört werden sollte, wie Meine Sonnenbrille ist zerbrochen. Hast du sie gebraucht?

Gebrauchen meint nicht nur die Benutzung sondern auch soviel wie benötigen:

  • Er hatte Mehl gebraucht, um einen Kuchen zu backen. besagt, dass das Mehl zum Kuchenbacken notwendig war.
  • Er hatte Mehl verbraucht, um einen Kuchen zu backen. Beim Kuchenbacken hat er Mehl verwendet, wodurch sich dessen Menge verringert hat.
  • Er hat das Mehl aufgebraucht, um einen Kuchen zu backen. Beim Kuchenbacken hat er das gesamte Mehl verwendet und jetzt ist keins mehr da.

Im Deutschen unterscheidet man auch zwischen Verbrauchsgegenständen (z. B. Zucker, Mehl, Öl, Benzin, Papier, Toner) und Gebrauchsgegenständen (z. B. Fahrrädern, Sonnenbrillen, Stühlen).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.