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I'm trying to build a site where users can customize their own print on a jersey. They can choose to have their own sponsor print on the jersey. How would you say 'Your own Sponsorprint' in German?

Google Translatation and a couple of Google searches gave me these two options:

  • Eigener Sponsordruck

  • Eigener Sponsorendruck

What to use?

I'm also struggling with "Your CompanyLogo". Is that 'Dein Firmenlogo' or 'Ihr Firmenlogo'?

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    FWIW, “Sponsorprint” would be more plausible as a German word than as an English one... – leftaroundabout Jun 19 '18 at 12:12
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The sponsor prints are often called "Trikotwerbung" in German. This literally translates to jersey advertising. Now, I don't know what your system looks like, but not everyone has enough sponsors to fill every position you offer. A sports club I was involved in only had a small sponsor (getting his logo on the sleeve), while front and back stayed free of advertising. But I have seen other clubs who only had a logo on the back and none on the sleeves. So if possible you should customize the location where the logo is displayed. Then you could have for example some of the following choices: "Ärmelaufdruck", "Brustaufdruck" and "Rückenaufdruck" (print on the sleeve, front, back).

Alternatively if you want to go with sponsorprint, I would suggest the use of "Sponsorendruck" or "Sponsorenaufdruck".

The difference between "Du" and "Sie" (or "Dein" and "Ihr") is a very important decision you need to make (and keep consistent and your whole site). In many languages (not English though) there is a formal and an informal way to approach people. Usually the formal way is preferred. In German this would result in the use of "Sie" as a replacement for "you" and "Ihr(e)" for "your". This is also the way I would expect an internet shop to address me. In sports (especially amateur clubs) the informal approach is very common (although not everywhere). Here the replacement for "you" would be "Du" and "your" become "Dein(e)". So it heavily depends on how close you are to your users.

If you are very close to the users (or they are almost only young people) the informal "Du" is appropriate. "Your company logo" should then be translated as "Dein Firmenlogo".

If you rather offer an internet shop for everyone (and especially people you don't know), you should rather go with "Sie" and "Ihr Firmenlogo".

  • Thanks so much. Make sense. One question: What if it's "Your own Sponsorprint" is it then "Eigener Sponsorendruck"? – Pedro Jun 19 '18 at 12:14
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    @Pedro Yes, but here again you need to be careful how you translate the "your". In the end it should be "Dein/Ihr eigener Sponsorenaufdruck". – QueensKnight Jun 19 '18 at 12:34
  • @Pedro: "...aufdruck" suits better then just "...druck". – alk Jun 22 '18 at 16:40

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