3

I don't understand what the preposition "mit" usage in the example above. If I was writing the sentence, I'd simply omit it.

2

The verb is mitkommen, and it is spilt in two parts. Therefore mit- is not a preposition but a prefix wandering about. An alternative way to phrase this would be “Willst du zu mir mitkommen?”

mitkommen verb [ intransitive ] [ trennbar, unreg., Perfekt mit sein ] /ˈmɪtkɔmən/ ​ andere an einen bestimmten Ort begleiten
to come (along/too)
Wir gehen Eisessen, kommst du mit?
We’re going for some ice cream. Do you want to come?
Synonym → mitgehen

That means, as is someone asks another person to join in on the way.

Leaving out mit:

“Willst du zu mir kommen?”

Would be used if the person mir is already at the destination (or not, in fact) and the person called du travels alone.

Mitkommen is more like 'escort', 'accompany' or 'come along' than just 'come' (alone, by yourself, ).

From comment by Janka:

In your example, mitkommen is used as an infinitive to the modal verb wollen. The prefix is usually not split from the infinitive, and Willst du zu mir mitkommen? is in fact as valid as your example. The prefix mit- however is special in some regards. It's also one of those few prefixes you could put on an already prefixed verb, e.g. mitansehen.

  • 2
    I always knew that the prefix should always be at the end , Is mitkommen an exception or could we do this with other verbs too ( putting prefix in the middle of the sentence ) – Yomna Essam Sep 28 '18 at 23:08
  • @YomnaEssam Change always to usually: Ich spreche dem Verb mitkommen ab, eine absolute Ausnahmeregel zu repräsentieren. Aber das sprechen wir lieber ab nach dem nächsten Sonnenaufgang. Manchmal verhandelt man sowas lieber nach bei Sonnenschein? – LangLangC Sep 28 '18 at 23:27
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    @Yomna Essam: In your example, mitkommen is used as an infinitive to the modal verb wollen. The prefix is usually not split from the infinitive, and Willst du zu mir mitkommen? is in fact as valid as your example. The prefix mit- however is special in some regards. It's also one of those few prefixes you could put on an already prefixed verb, e.g. mitansehen. – Janka Sep 28 '18 at 23:55
  • @Janka I would understand mit in this example to be an adverb and the main verb to be kommen. A similar dispute arised here. Could you please provide a link to any formal source of grammar or a quote from a textbook that supports the idea of wandering prefixes in the middle of the sentence? – Abdullah Oct 4 '18 at 9:42
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    These aren't "wandering prefixes". In contrary, the adverb+verb combination mit+kommen means exactly the same as the verb mitkommen and in no way some sort of kommen. E.g. Möchtest du mit mir (mit)kommen. — Er kommt mit mir (mit). This additional mit doesn't even intensify the action. – Janka Oct 4 '18 at 12:43
1

I'm not entirely convinced, that this is an example of mitkommen, so my attempt here:

If one is already at home, he could suggest:

Willst Du zu mir kommen?

The mentioned sentence is typically used, if the subject is not at home but still has to go there and suggests that the addressed person joins him.

So a more exact translation would be:

Would you join me going home?

Another scenario, where mit is applicable is, if another person was asked before and already agreed, so mit means to join that different person instead of the speaker.

  • How would that "at home" scenario lead to using mit, like in the OP example? – LangLangC Oct 1 '18 at 7:32
  • @LangLangC: you seem to refer to a context I can't recognize from the terse original question. Which? (With mentioned sentence I intended to refer to the OP example...) – guidot Oct 1 '18 at 8:50
  • That's the point. For your example to match the OP a context needs to be elaborated. Sth like: Alice is at home and refers to someone else (Bob) who already agreed to come over. Now she asks Bob's roommate Clint if he wants to join Bob in coming over? (Mit Bob kommen, mit Bob mitkommen.) – LangLangC Oct 1 '18 at 8:57

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