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A: Ja, ja, genau . Danke, Frau Weyer.
Ach , und bitte auch noch die Adresse von Herrn Theissen aus Detmold.

B: Gern. - Hier: Frank Theissen.

Is Gern the short version of Gern geschehen?

9

No. Gern geschehen is a response to someone thanking you for something that you have done. In your example, when B says gern, she has not yet done anything with respect to the request (and, consequently, A hasn't yet thanked her for it), so gern geschehen would not fit.

Rather, gern means with pleasure. B indicates to A that she is happy to look up the address.

A: Ach , und bitte auch noch die Adresse von Herrn Theissen aus Detmold.

B: Gern. (With pleasure.) - Hier: Frank Theissen, Bahnhofplatz 1, 32123 Detmold.

A: Vielen Dank!

B: Gern geschehen. (You're welcome.)

5

No, it's a »shorty« for

Das mache ich gern
(certainly)

»Gern geschehen« refers to the past.

1

In

A: Ja, ja, genau . Danke, Frau Weyer.
Ach , und bitte auch noch die Adresse von Herrn Theissen aus Detmold.

B: Gern. - Hier: Frank Theissen.

Gern means:

gern adverb
gladly adv
Ich würde gerne alles tun, um dir zu helfen. –– I would gladly do anything to help you.

and seldom
with pleasure adv · willingly adv · readily adv · fondly adv · fain adv · lief adv [oldfashioned]

But since it is so overused, the above translation should not be taken literally. Most people just express a filler like "Here you go", "of course", "naturally" with only an ever so slightly tiny little bit of elevated politeness attached to gern.

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