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I can understand most of the text when it is in German, but I feel totally weak to write or speak in German. I need training. Is there a site that offers sentences in English - of a kind of complexity and not as every day patterns of speaking - together with their translation?

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    Did you see this list of Resources for learning German already? – Arsak Nov 20 '18 at 16:08
  • No, I did not. I went through, now, and I tried to spot what might include a content close to my training needs. Difficult to find something but I will keep trying. Nevertheless, if anyone has a specific recommendation I will appreciate advising me. THKS – giorgos Nov 20 '18 at 18:08
  • It is German only, but anyway, you could try and see if www.ich-will-deutsch-lernen.de offers something that helps you. – Christian Geiselmann Nov 20 '18 at 18:21
  • THKS I must check it though in 3 weeks, as meanwhile I work only with iPad and Adobe needed is not an option. – giorgos Nov 20 '18 at 18:30
  • The closest thing I know is Reverso app. There is a section for learning new vocabulary. As you learn new words, you go through flashcards with translated examples. However, you can not take this translation for granted. It could be full of mistakes. I think linguee is just the same. I could recommend a different approach from a personal experience. Hammer's grammar book is a trusted book that is full of translated examples (formal and informal, spoken and literature) that cover almost every angle of German. If you can translate these examples, you can almost translate anything. – Abdullah Nov 20 '18 at 18:36
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Have you tried looking for 'side-by-side' or 'parallel' texts? A Google search using those terms plus the two languages yields a lot of options at many different levels of complexity!

Some examples of varying levels of complexity of English/German parallel texts can be found at:

http://paralleltext.io/

http://germanamericanpioneers.org/GermanEnglishStoriessidebyside.htm

http://bilinguis.com/book/alice/de/en/c1/

If that fails you, you can always make your own version of a parallel text simply by finding a text in your native language, getting the German version, and reading the two side-by-side! I find it especially helpful to do this with texts I'm already very familiar with in my native language so that I can pretty accurately guess what the sentences mean in German and practice the grammar in a natural, passive way, but have my original there to guide me if things get too complex.

  • Deleted my last comment since it wasn't quite accurate: the Parallel Text site audio works fine on my computer, but fwiw on my phone, it pronounces everything as if it were English, at least with the French and German samples I tried. – Maroon Nov 21 '18 at 2:20
  • I will delete nothing !!! Your response is great, I already tried with parallel text and it is what I missed. Thank you for giving me the needed guidance. – giorgos Nov 21 '18 at 10:38

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