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I am not sure if anyone has tried Pollard's methods of translation. His book on "Analytical Approach to German Translation" gives pretty useful rules. One of the rules for separable verbs is a general sentence of the form

Er kommt ... noun // adverb adverb ... hin.

He says that pick the separable prefix back to the verb along with other adverbs to the first noun for translation. Proceed to translation word by word. This works pretty well for simple sentences. In the exercise, he gives an example,

Die wesentliche Verschiedenheit der dauerhaften Güter einerseits // und der Nutzungen derselben anderseits tritt in diesen Fällen langer Dauerhaftigkeit (NOUN) // besonders deutlich und klar // hervor //.

(These slashes indicate breaks // in translations.)

Now there are several nouns in this sentence, hervor goes back to hervortritt. As per his rules, the other words between the last noun and the separable prefixes go back to the first noun. He does not explain what is he referring to as the first noun (in the presence of several nouns, of course). It is the first noun after the verb? Where should we place the part besonders deutlich und klar? In his answers these adverbs went to Fällen, hence the translation is

The essential difference of the durable good on the one hand and the utility of the same on the other hand stands out clearly and distinctly especially in the cases of long durability.

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I have never heard of this method, so I can't tell if it really works. I also have no idea how to interpret those explanations. If there is something missing in the book, i normally would recommend to ask the author, but since Mrs. Pollard war born 1902 (her book is from 1957), this might be hard.

I just can recommend to analyze the grammar of the German sentence, to find out what belongs together.

This sentence is neither a question nor a command, so it is a statement, and in a German statement there is one very hard rule:

The finite (i.e. inflected) part of the verb always stands on position 2 of the sentence.
All other parts of the verb (if there are more parts) are located at the end of the sentence.

So, everything before the verb is one single part of speech (well, there can be exceptions, but they are rare). So these 12 words (everything before the first verb!) are one part of speech:

Die wesentliche Verschiedenheit der dauerhaften Güter einerseits und der Nutzungen derselben anderseits

And this sequence contains a noun in nominative case (die Verschiedenheit), and since there is no other word in nominative case in the whole sentence, this word must belong to the subject. So the 12 words at the beginning together form the subject. Let's think of it later in detail, and for now let's replace it with a personal pronoun, that matches with the core of the subject (die Verschiedenheit) in number and gender:

Sie tritt in diesen Fällen langer Dauerhaftigkeit besonders deutlich und klar hervor.

So, now he have a subject (sie), and the finite part of the verb (tritt, infinite form: treten). Let's see, if the last word is something, that belongs to the verb. We find hervor which can be joined to treten, giving the separable verb hervortreten.

Sie tritt ... hervor.

This is Präsens (in most cases equivalent to present tense). To test, if the two words really are parts of a separable word, we can convert this sentence into Futur I (equivalent to future tense). Then the verb will appear in its infinite, i.e. unseparated form, because now the auxiliary verb werden will be inflected and has to occupy position 2:

Sie wird ... hervortreten.

So now we have the complete subject (12 words) and the complete verb (2 words) the rest must be predicatives or objects.

In German grammar we only call tritt together with hervor the Prädikat. In English Grammar, the term predicate has a wider meaning. Also the parts of speech that I called "the rest" would belong to it, but in German grammar they do not.


Prädikat

We found out, the the Prädikat is

hervortreten

dict.leo.org offers some possible translations:

to emerge, to abound, to step/come forward, to bunch out


Subjekt

Die wesentliche Verschiedenheit der dauerhaften Güter einerseits und der Nutzungen derselben anderseits

You already translated it correctly. I offer just another variation (I also would have used zwischen + Dativ instead of a genitive construction in the German sentence):

The essential difference between the durable good on the one hand and the utility of the same on the other hand


"the rest"

The rest is a Präpositionalobjekt (prepositional object)

in diesen Fällen langer Dauerhaftigkeit

and a Prädikativum (predicative expression)

besonders deutlich und klar

The prepositional object translates to

in these cases of long durability

and the predicative expression contains the fixed phrase »deutlich und klar« which you find more often in reverse order (»klar und deutlich«). But the two adjectives are synonyms, they mean the same. So literally it would translate as »clearly and clearly«, but that doesn't make sense in an English sentence. One »clearly« is enough. So »besonders deutlich und klar« just is

very clearly


complete translation

So let's join together what we have:

The essential difference between the durable good on the one hand and the utility of the same on the other hand emerges very clearly in these cases of long durability.

  • Alles recht hübsch, nur: ist "in diesen Fällen langer Dauerhaftigkeit" tatsächlich ein Präpositionalobjekt? Oder vielleicht doch eher eine adverbiale Ergänzung? ;-) – multiplex et liber Nov 25 '18 at 11:36
  • Thanks, Hubert. That was a very thorough analysis. I studied more of his problems on his rule, it seems that the "first noun" he refers to is the first noun after the verb. Thus, besonders deutlich und klar goes with Fällen. Of course, there might be exceptions, but it seems this strategy works for fairly complicated sentences. – M. Farooq Nov 25 '18 at 15:29

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