2

I was reading an article about a football manager talking at the end of a match:

"So ist Fußball. So ist er gut. So ist er toll."

I know that so is a complicated word in German, but for the sentence

So ist Fußball

I thought so meant "That"

but in

So ist er gut

I thought it meant "That is good."

But what is the purpose of er in that sentence.

What purpose does it serve?

8

In this sentence, »so« means »in this manner« / »when done that way« / etc. You can read more about this meaning in https://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/so_derartig_solch_genauso_etwa#Bedeutung1a, entry 1a. Thus one may render the sentences as

That way is how football is. When done that way, it is good. When done that way, it is great.

A more idiomatic translation might be

That's football. It's good like that. It's great like that.

So the »er« is a personal pronoun, masculine, which refers to football (»Fußball«).

| improve this answer | |
  • Yep so the "so" actually has two functions in that sentence - "That is" and "In that way" – vik1245 Feb 10 '19 at 0:51
  • 3
    IOW, loosely translated: "That's football. That's the way I like it. That's the way I love it!". – Rudy Velthuis Feb 10 '19 at 2:03
  • The first translation is bad, the second one is much better – PiedPiper Feb 10 '19 at 13:10
  • 1
    @PiedPiper I agree. The first translation was meant to be more or less literal, so that the meaning of »so« becomes clear. – konst Feb 10 '19 at 13:42
  • I just wanted to make it clear to the OP and any other learner that this is not what they should be emulating – PiedPiper Feb 10 '19 at 15:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.