5

Different materials make different noises on being hit, depending on their make up, density, material, size etc.

I’m interested in the description of sound between English and German. In English the sounds often resemble what they sound like, in the examples below “thud/clang/thwock/swish/click/clack”, but what are some corresponding german sounds using the below examples? I’ve tried to do some similar translations but a native speaker may use something more appropriate.  

Wood makes quite often a rather dull thudding noise.
Holz macht oft ein dumpfes aufschlagendes Geräusch.

Metal makes a higher pitched clang if it’s a long pole or can twang and reverberate if its hammered flat and thin.
Metall macht einen hellklingenden Schall, wenn eine lange dunne Stange geschlagen wird, oder kann ?scharf klingen und nachklingen wenn es flach und dünn gehämmert ist.

Plastic makes an intermediate pitched but rather dull thwock.
Plastik macht einen mäßig-gestimmten aber ziemlich dumpfen Klang.

But a thin plastic bowl can make a hollow high pitched sound when whacked with a thin object.
Aber eine dünne Plastikschüssel kann einen …… hellklingenden Klang beim Schlagen von einem dünnen Objekt machen.

A plastic bag rustles like autumn leaves but a paper bag has more of a crunch to it.
Eine Plastiktüte raschelt wie Laub aber eine Papiertüte macht was ?knackiges.

A silk skirt swishes quietly while high heels produce a distinct clicking clacking noise.
Ein Kleid aus Seide rauscht leiser, während Absätze ein eindeutig ………………. Geräusch machen.

The tone of a large wooden marimba is low, deep, full and melodic compared to the tinny sound of a child’s glockenspiel.
Der Ton von einer grossen Marimba ist tief, satt und melodisch im Vergleich zu dem, von einem Kinds Glockenspiel.  

If there are any better ways of describing sound in german, please feel free to add.    

6

As far as my life experience goes, sound making of objects while hitting/ being hit is mainly dependent from two factors: material clashing and context of the clashing "points": edge/ point or "flat" surface. Beside situations like the paper example where nothing seems to be hit.

That said, I need to differ: which involved material is solid or hollow? Which object is moved and which is fixed to the environment. Which one is bigger?

My suggestions in italic.

Wood makes quite often a rather dull thudding noise. Holz macht oft ein dumpfes Geräusch.

Metal makes a higher pitched clang if it’s a long pole or can twang and reverberate if its hammered flat and thin. Metall macht einen hohen hellen Ton, wenn eine lange dünne Stange geschlagen wird, und klingt kurz und hell, wenn es flach ist.

Plastic makes an intermediate pitched but rather dull thwock. Plastik macht einen mäßig-gestimmten und ziemlich dumpfen Klang ohne Nachhall.

But a thin plastic bowl can make a hollow high pitched sound when whacked with a thin object. Aber eine dünne Plastikschüssel kann einen kurzen Halleffekt beim Schlagen von einem dünnen Objekt machen.

A plastic bag rustles like autumn leaves but a paper bag has more of a crunch to it. Eine Plastiktüte raschelt wie Laub und knistert hell während eine Papiertüte lauter und dumpfer raschelt.

A silk skirt swishes quietly while high heels produce a distinct clicking clacking noise. Ein Kleid aus Seide raschelt sehr leise und sanft, während Pfennigabsätze ein eindeutig klackerndes Geräusch machen.

The tone of a large wooden marimba is low, deep, full and melodic compared to the tinny sound of a child’s glockenspiel. Der Ton von einer grossen Marimba ist tief, satt und melodisch im Vergleich zu dem hellen klaren Klang eines Glockenspiels*. (*sorry, I can't limit it to children)

Generally speaking I see the problem of "how to describe sound objectivly" as it is easier when there is a known setting to any reader. Comparison works only if I have an idea of compared object - I can't say "it sounds like wood" if wood is unknown - and if it is to well known because every wood sounds different.

4

Here is an interesting piece on onomatopoeia (dt: Lautmalerei) by well-known language columnist Bastian Sick in which he composes the following list for verbs that resemble the sounds they describe:

ächzen, babbeln, ballern, bammeln, belfern, bellen, bibbern, bimmeln, blaffen, blöken, blubbern, bölken, bollern, brabbeln, brausen, britzeln, brodeln, brüllen, brummen, brutzeln, buhen, bummern, bumsen, donnern, dotzen, dröhnen, fauchen, ficken, fiepen, fiepsen, fipsen, fisseln, flappen, fluppen, flüstern, flutschen, furzen, gackern, gacksen, gähnen, gauzen, gickeln, gicksen, girren, gluckern, glucksen, gongen, grochsen, grölen, grollen, grummeln, grunzen, gurren, hauchen, hecheln, heulen, hicksen, hissen, holpern, hupen, husten, hüsteln, jammern, janken, jauchzen, jaulen, jodeln, johlen, juchen, juchzen, kakeln, keckern, keuchen, kichern, kieksen, kitzeln, klacken, klackern, kläffen, klappen, klappern, klapsen, klatschen, klecken, kleckern, klecksen, klempern, klicken, klickern, klimpern, klingeln, klingen, klippen, klirren, klitschen, klopfen, kloppen, klötern, knabbern, knacken, knacksen, knallen, knarren, knarzen, knattern, knatschen, knicken, knicksen, knipsen, knirren, knirschen, knispeln, knistern, knittern, knuffen, knurren, knuspern, kollern, krachen, krächzen, krähen, kreischen, kreißen, küssen, lallen, lispeln, lullen, lutschen, manschen, matschen, maunzen, meckern, miauen, motzen, mucken, mucksen, muffeln, muhen, munkeln, murmeln, murren, naschen, niesen, nölen, nörgeln, nuckeln, nutschen, paffen, panschen, pantschen, pappeln, patschen, pfeifen, pfropfen, picken, piepen, piepsen, piksen, pinken, pinkeln, pispern, pissen, pladdern, plappern, plärren, plantschen, platschen, plätschern, platzen, plaudern, plauschen, plitschern, ploppen, plumpsen, pochen, poltern, poppen, prahlen, prassen, prasseln, prusten, puckern, pudeln, puffen, pullern, pumpen, pupen, puppern, pupsen, pusten, putschen, quabbeln, quaken, quäken, quarren, quatschen, quieken, quietschen, rappeln, rascheln, rasseln, ratschen, rattern, rauschen, röcheln, röhren, rotzen, rucken, rucksen, rummeln, rumpeln, rumsen, rülpsen, ruscheln, rutschen, sausen, säuseln, schellen, scheppern, schlabbern, schlucken, schlupfen, schlüpfen, schlürfen, schmatzen, schmettern, schnackeln, schnappen, schnarchen, schnarren, schnattern, schnauben, schnaufen, schnauzen, schnäuzen, schnicken, schniefen, schnippen, schnipsen, schnorcheln, schnüffeln, schnupfen, schnuppern, schnurren, schurren, schrillen, schwabbeln, schwappen, schwatzen, schwätzen, schwirren, seufzen, simmen, sirren, spratzen, spritzen, sprotzen, stammeln, stottern, suckeln, süffeln, summen, suppen, surren, tacken, tackern, tattern, ticken, traben, trällern, trappeln, trappen, tratschen, trillern, trippeln, trommeln, tröten, tschiepen, tschilpen, tuckern, tuscheln, tuten, wabbeln, wiehern, wimmern, winseln, wispern, wummern, zecken, zicken, ziepen, zirpen, zischen, zischeln, zullen, zutschen, zuzeln, zwitschern

This might not be an exhaustive list of these 'sound verbs', but it is certainly expansive.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.