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Does the compounding of nouns affect the preposition which the root-noun takes?

For example, “Stelle” takes “auf” and “Dienststelle” does as well. Does this hold for every root and every compound? What about roots that can take multiple prepositions? Are the prepositions of the compounds the same as those for the roots, when used with the same intent?

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Q: Does the compounding of nouns affect the preposition which the root-noun takes?

No, it doesn't.

This is so, because the choice of the appropriate preposition depends on the verb, not on the noun. Consequently, it is irrelevant if the noun is composed or not. Notice, however, that a verb can be used with different prepositions and that it depends on the context which preposition is appropriate (see the remark of the first example below).

Here are some examples:

Ich befinde mich gerade auf der besagten Stelle.
(alternatively: an der besagten Stelle, when Stelle is meant as a synonyme of Platz)
Ich befinde mich gerade auf der Dienststelle.

Ich ging heute zu der Stelle.
Ich ging heute zu der Dienststelle.

Wenden Sie sich an die zuständige Stelle.
Wenden Sie sich an die zuständige Dienststelle.


Der Vogel flog übers Haus.
Der Vogel flog übers Gartenhaus.

Die Leiter lehnt am Haus.
Die Leiter lehnt am Gartenhaus.

Sie lief im Haus umher.
Sie lief im Gartenhaus umher.

  • I disagree. No strong rule can be inferred from your list of examples. There are cases where preposition are inseparably prefixed to a verb, and there are cases where not just the verb rules, because e.g. "sein" works with many preposition, and it depends on the context, that the object marks. For me personally, it is often the case that the preposition itself commands the choice of words. – vectory Mar 27 '19 at 17:18

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