0

What is the difference between these verbs which express "to restrict", "to limit" in German: einschränken, beschränken, eingrenzen, begrenzen, einengen? My conclusions so far:

  • einschränken= "to restrict" = "to reduce". Caused deliberately by sb. or his actions (eg. decree), a government, a company, etc
  • beschränken = "to limit" = "to set a limit (often a point) for sth., beyond which there will be a penalty or undesirable consequences". Caused deliberately or by the inherent nature of things (eg rain, land, water)
  • as setting a limit implicitly defines a restriction, the 2 verbs may be used interchangeably in most contexts. In some contexts, one of them is used more often (eg "to limit"/"beschränken" is more common with speed limits, "to restrict"/"einschränken" with freedom and rights)
  • einengen = to restrict movement or space (concrete meaning), to reduce the scope (= narrow down), to restrict (abstract meaning)
  • begrenzen = to limit/restrict, to border
  • eingrenzen = to enclose, to reduce the number of possibilities or the scope of sth. ( = to narrow down)

Is that right? Here are some examples and my corresponding guesses:

  • The government limited / restricted the max speed in all highways to 100 km/h = Die Regierung hat die Höchstgeschwindigkeit auf allen Schnellstraßen auf 100 km/h begrenzt / beschränkt.

  • We have limited / restricted our stay to one week = Wir haben unseren Aufenthalt auf eine Woche begrenzt / beschränkt.

  • Dictators always restrict people's rights. = Diktatoren begrenzen / grenzen /engen / schränken immer die Rechte der Menschen (ein).

  • The new decree restricted freedom of speech. = Das neue Dekret hat die Redefreiheit begrenzt / eingegrenzt / eingeengt / eingeschränkt.

  • The new jacket restricted him. (it is very tight) = Die neue Jacke hat ihn etwas eingeengt.

  • We limited / restricted our consumption of milk to 5 liters per week. = Wir haben unseren Verbrauch auf 5 Liter pro Woche begrenzt / beschränkt.

  • This poor soil limits what can be planted here. = Dieser schlechte Boden begrenzt / grenzt / engt / beschränkt / schränkt (ein), was hier gepflanzt werden kann.

2

Your so-called "guesses" are beautiful. :-) Yet, let me give you some hints here and there to make them completely idiomatic.

Die Regierung hat die Höchstgeschwindigkeit auf allen Schnellstraßen auf 100 km/h begrenzt / beschränkt. - PERFECT

Wir haben unseren Aufenthalt auf eine Woche begrenzt / beschränkt. - I'd prefer beschränken to begrenzen, but that's rather a matter of personal taste.

Diktatoren begrenzen / grenzen /engen / schränken immer die Rechte der Menschen (ein). - begrenzen isn't possible here, whereas einschränken would be my preference. beschneiden would also be fine here.

Das neue Dekret hat die Redefreiheit begrenzt / eingegrenzt / eingeengt / eingeschränkt. - einschränken is perfect, einengen might be ok, the other two seem unidiomatic to me.

Die neue Jacke hat ihn etwas eingeengt. - Um ... sounds a bit emphatic in my ears. I'd say: Die neue Jacke war ihm zu eng. Er konnte sich kaum noch bewegen. or Die Jacke war zu eng und hat seine Bewegungsfreiheit eingeschränkt.

Wir haben unseren (? Verbrauch ? ->) Milchkonsum auf 5 Liter pro Woche begrenzt / beschränkt. - Here again rather beschränken than begrenzen. As the intake was higher before, I'd suggest reduzieren.

Dieser schlechte Boden begrenzt / grenzt / engt / beschränkt / schränkt (ein), was hier gepflanzt werden kann. - Hmmm ... das klingt für mich sehr konstruiert. ;-) Idomatisch wäre z.B. Der schlechte Boden lässt nur wenige Arten zu. / ... lässt nur die Pflanzung weniger Arten zu.

Seems like begrenzen doesn't stand much chances for me :-))

  • From DWDS examples of"begrenzen", it seems to me that it's used in its conjugated form only as "to limit" (= set a maximum point, draw a boundary) indeed, eg Geschwindigkeit, Redezeit, Aufnahmealter begrenzen. Nevertheless, it is also used in past participle with a wider meaning of restriction, eg begrenzter Wettbewerb, Möglichkeiten, Wirkung, Horizon. – Alan Evangelista Apr 14 at 14:23
-3
  • einschränken, related to Schrank "closet" and in the same way relates to to close-in, close-off

  • beschränken relates further to "Schranke" (En. "..."?), to set up borde posts, now fig. of figurative areas, ideas

  • The way you describe it, my above notions might be the other way around, sure.

  • einengen "constrict", much narrower meaning. A narrow is tightend. Otherwise its often encroaching on bedrängen. Comparing to shrink, there might be a notable parallel to -schränken, as narrow passes are notoriously subject to fencing and taxation.

  • Grenze, middle ages Latin, same ideas as for -schränken, but a later development

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.