5

I saw a post on Facebook with the phrase

Das Leben ist zu kurz, um Deutsch zu lernen.

Is it also correct to say one of the following:

  • Das Leben ist zu kurz, als dass man Deutsch lernt.
  • Das Leben ist zu kurz, als dass man Deutsch lernen kann.
  • Das Leben ist zu kurz, als dass man Deutsch lernen könnte.

Would any of these be correct or have the same meaning?

1

First of all, notice that final clauses with um ... zu require the subject of the main clause and the implicit subject of the infitivie clause to be the same.1, 2, 3, 4, 5 As an example, consider the sentence:

Ich brauche Zeit, um Deutsch zu lernen.

Here, both subjects are ich ("ich brauche Zeit" and "ich lerne Deutsch"). Now, consider the sentence:

Das Leben ist zu kurz, um Deutsch zu lernen.

Here, the subject of the main clause is das Leben ("das Leben ist zu kurz"), whereas the implicit subject of the infinitive clause is ich or man ("ich lerne Deutsch" or "man lernt Deutsch"). In standard German, the sentence is considered wrong; but you may hear or read such uses of um ... zu in spite of incongruent subjects in colloquial speech.


Some alternatives are the following sentences:

  • Das Leben ist zu kurz, als dass man Deutsch lernen kann. (indicative)
  • Das Leben ist zu kurz, als dass man Deutsch lernen könne. (subjunctive I)
  • Das Leben ist zu kurz, als dass man Deutsch lernen könnte. (subjunctive II)
  • Das Leben ist zu kurz zum Deutschlernen. (nominalization)

It is a matter of style, rather than of correctness, which alternative is preferrable. Purists would insist that als dass should be used with subjuctive I rather than with indicative. Still others might argue that, due to the irreal mood, only subjunctive II were correct.6

I prefer the latter, succinct alternative; and I dare to assert that—at least in spoken German—it occurs more frequently than the other ones.


Sources:
1 canoo.net
2 deutsch.info
3 deutschplus.net
4 dw.com
5 lerngrammatik.de
6 canoo.net

  • Your altenatives remind me of the "leichte Sprache" - because for the idiomatic/ quick statement I would avoid a long word like Deutschlernen. I'm just surprised about my "observation". See german.stackexchange.com/q/7832/36160 for a question about "leichte Sprache". – Shegit Brahm May 21 at 13:39
  • 1
    Die Regel, die Das Leben ist zu kurz, um… schlecht machen soll, gilt in der genannten Form nicht. Vergleiche: Kritik wird gemieden, um die Gefühle des anderen zu schonen. Auch Aqua-Gymnastik ist geeignet, um sich im Alter fit zu halten. – David Vogt May 22 at 14:36
  • Vielleicht paßt das zu der von @jonathan.scholbach angeregten Meta-Debatte. – David Vogt May 22 at 14:37
  • Your prescription is non-sense. Life as a noun is general enough that it may be the indefinite Subject of the infinite clause, even if the semantics appear odd parsed like that. After all it's someone's life that's talked about, metonymic for that someone. – vectory May 22 at 15:14
  • Ich finde es wenig hilfreich, Deutschlernenden zu vermitteln, es gäbe eigentlich keine Regeln, und dass wir aus unseren Antworten Aufsätze machen, die „[...] sprachliche Varietäten und auch den Sprachwandel berücksichtigen und auf den eigenen Horizont reflektieren [...]“ (vgl. Herrn Scholbachs Antwort in der Meta-Debatte), zumal ich auf colloquial use hingewiesen habe. – Björn Friedrich May 22 at 15:24
0

The phrasing itself is "correct enough" in all examples.

About the nuances:

Das Leben ist zu kurz, um Deutsch zu lernen.

In my opinion that is generally used to describe that the second part (um Deutsch zu lernen) is a task that requires personal work and effort. This is the general meaning that is provided by all given examples. They differ in the matter of "what has to be pointed out".

Das Leben ist zu kurz, als dass man Deutsch lernt.

Similiar to the first one with a little bit stressing the point that it seems impossible to do it.

Das Leben ist zu kurz, als dass man Deutsch lernen kann

Combination of first and second: the personal work and effort is to high to achieve this goal - if it is possible in general.

Das Leben ist zu kurz, als dass man Deutsch lernen könnte

This phrase claims that noone is able to master the german language in its life. It implies that there is no need to consider the personal work and effort, it will be more than fits into a span of life.

With "correct enough" I'd like to point out that I see them in spoken language as correct, I just would not use all of them.

For me the first (commonly known) structure seems universal in German, the second one would be the lazy form of the last one - I would prefer the last over the second but I would speak out loud the second. Only the third example I would not come up on my own.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.