5

In the S-Bahn, I keep hearing something like

Einsatz bitte

or

Einstein bitte

But I am pretty sure I am misunderstanding the sounds that it is said.

The context is the voice in the S-Bahn right when the doors open. I assume it means

Beware of the door opening

or something like that, but I am not sure.

  • "Einsatz bitte" That probably would apply for Japanese public traffic services :-D. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 6 '19 at 18:21
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    ... where Einstein bitte might appeal to the "collective intelligence", what's the right action to do right when the train doors are open. S-Bahn voice requests will always be a complete mystery: youtube.com/watch?v=0n0g8S3aA0o – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 6 '19 at 18:29
8

The context is the voice in the S-Bahn right when the doors open.

The usual request from the S Bahn voice when the doors of the train open is

Einsteigen Bitte!

which means

Get in please!

in English.

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    In quick speech, this may water down: [ˈaɪnˌʃtaɪɡən ˈbɪtə] → [ˈaɪnˌʃtaɪɡŋ̩ ˈbɪtə] → [ˈaɪnˌʃtaɪŋ ˈbɪtə] → [ˈaɪnˌʃtaɪŋ͡m ˈbɪtə] → [ˈaɪnˌʃtaɪm ˈbɪtə], which is pretty much the same as Einstein bitte. – mach Jun 9 '19 at 9:56
1

As a sidenote to the correct answer I'd like to point out that there is sometimes (like in Berlin) a second announcement

Zurückbleiben bitte!

which translates to

Stay behind / Keep back

to signal that boarding time is over and passengers should avoid entering because the doors are closing. (thanks to Volker Landgraf)

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    Actually both are used in Berlin. Einsteigen (bitte) means that the boarding time will soon be over, while Zurückbleiben (bitte) means that it is over and you should stay behind and wait for the next train if you haven't boarded this one yet. – Volker Landgraf Jun 7 '19 at 8:51
  • @VolkerLandgraf: reading your comment make me remember it, thanks, I will update – Shegit Brahm Jun 7 '19 at 9:12
  • Never heard the addition "bitte" in Berlin S-Bahn. – harper Jun 14 '19 at 5:02

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