3

We were having a conversation in French, and I was wondering how I'd express the same idea in German:

En arrivant à l'aéroport, on est passés par je ne sais combien de contrôles de sécurité tous plus rigoureux les uns que les autres.

  • {Literally}: After arriving at the airport, we went through I-do-not-know-how-many security checks, each more strict than the next.

This colloquial hyperbolic expression comes in the form of "je ne sais combien/quel/etc {interrogative pronoun}"; and in the case of "je ne sais combien (de)", it is used to refer to the extraordinary, staggering amount/number of something -- so much so that literally "I don't know how much / how many X" there are in total.

How is this idea commonly/idiomatically expressed in German?

I wonder if "... von was-weiß-ich-wie-viel-X" without "nicht" works?

  • 1
    Ich glaube der engl. Satz sollte "more strict than the previous" lauten, stimmts? – user unknown Jun 30 '19 at 5:08
  • 2
    @userunknown Hi. While I see where you're coming from on this one, not quite. The phrasing I used is actually the idiomatic one here when it is immediately preceded by a noun: "... security checks, each more strict than the next / than the last". E.g.: "Gorgeous snow sculptures, each more beautiful than the next, decorate the castle walls". The phrasing you used, on the other hand, tends to be preceded by a verb: "Each/Every X is more beautiful than the previous one / than the last / than the one before". – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Jun 30 '19 at 7:56
  • Well, I'm not that fluent. So my suggestion should be: "than the last", not "than the previous". "Each more strict than the next" would mean, they get less and less strict - doesn't it? – user unknown Jul 1 '19 at 7:31
  • "was weiß ich wie viele" works fine. Note though that the German languade rarely use hyphens. As a rule of thumb, use them only when constructing compount nouns that contain loanwords and/ or abbreviations (e.g- "IT-Sicherheit", "Software-Manager", "ABC-Waffe", ...) or when stressing syllabication (e.g. if someone is upset like: "Das is un-er-hört!") – hajef Jul 1 '19 at 9:58
3

The sentence En arrivant à l'aéroport, on est passés par je ne sais combien de contrôles de sécurité tous plus rigoureux les uns que les autres. can be translated almost literally. The following sentence sounds totally natural:

Bei der Ankunft am Flughafen mussten wir durch - ich weiß nicht wie viele - Sicherheitskontrollen, eine strenger als die andere.

Alternative, one would say:

  • ... durch zig Sicherheitskontrollen
  • ... durch x Sicherheitskontrollen
  • I see. Is "wieviele" the correct word to use here, not "wie viele"? – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Jun 30 '19 at 17:29
  • @Con-gras-tue-les-chiens: Gut beobachtet! Nach Neuer Rechtschreibung (1996) muss man "wieviele/wie viele" getrennt schreiben. – Frank from Frankfurt Jul 1 '19 at 7:22
3

Hier are a number of popular expressions:

Am Flughafen musstet wir durch weiß der Teufel wie viele Kontrollen durch.

Am Flughafen musstet wir durch weiß Gott wie viele Kontrollen durch.

Am Flughafen musst du dann durch wer weiß wie viele Kontrollen durch. [This tends to be related to the future, not to past experience]

Am Flughafen musstet wir durch weiß der Kuckuck wie viele Kontrollen durch.

Am Flughafen mussten wir durch du glaubst nicht wie viele Kontrollen durch.

Am Flughafen muss man immer durch was weiß ich wie viele Kontrollen durch.

Am Flughafen mussten wir durch weiß der Deibel wie viele Kontrollen durch.

Am Flughafen mussten wir durch man glaubt es nicht wie viele Kontrollen durch.

Am Flughafen mussten wir durch du glaubst es nicht wie viele Kontrollen durch.

All these are common in casual oral communication, not in writing. The syntax is peculiar, but all the above sentences would be received by he German speaking public as completely acceptable in oral communication. - You could, of course, argue about how to spell these sentences exactly, e.g. you could use parentheses or dashes to separate the "wer weiß wie viele" part. However, as the oral expression flows through just so, my personal preference would be writing this like I did, without additional punctuation.

  • Hi. The other day, in conversation I recall saying something like: "Das wäre in meinen Augen deutlich cooler als so ein alberner Endzeit-Kult!". Can I rephrase this (on a mocking, derogatory tone) as: "Das wäre in meinen Augen deutlich cooler als (so ein) weiß der Teufel welcher Endzeit-Kult!". Incidentally, "so ein" needs to be dropped in this phrasing, I take it? – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Jul 4 '19 at 10:50
1

Nach Ankunft am Flughafen passierten wir, ich weiß nicht wie viele, Sicherheitschecks, einer rigoroser als der andere.

Die Phrase selbst kann man fast wortwörtlich übersetzen - nur der Satzbau weist natürlich die deutschen Eigenheiten auf.

Bindestriche werden nicht gesetzt. Als eine der unsichersten Figuren in Sachen Kommasetzung, die man im Netz findet, behaupte ich, dass der Verbundcharakter der Phrase

Nach Ankunft am Flughafen passierten wir was weiß ich wie viele Sicherheitschecks, einer strenger als der andere.

sich nur auf die Popularität stützt. Üblich ist die Formel auch.

  • The German equivalent of the construction "X tous plus Y les uns que les autres" was eluding me, too. Thanks. – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Jun 30 '19 at 5:43
  • So the inverted "was weiß ich wie viele X" without "nicht" does work, I see. Is a string of hyphens unnecessary in German? Also, do the two phrases you suggest work just as well with other interrogative pronouns than "wie (viele)"? – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Jun 30 '19 at 5:50
  • 1
    Germans also tend to use hyperboles to convey the meaning. "Nach der Ankunft am Flughafen mussten wir erstmal durch eine Millionen Sicherheitschecks, einer gründlicher als der andere". – infinitezero Jun 30 '19 at 11:40
  • @Con-gras-tue-les-chiens: A string of hyphens would be wrong. "Ich weiß nicht wie viele" oder "was weiß ich ..." ist ein gängiger Ausdruck aber keiner, der die Funktion eines einzelnen Wortes, wie etwa "Er spielt den Hans-Guck-In-Die-Luft" übernimmt. Ich schätze, das kann man aber noch besser erklären. "Ich weiß nicht wie oft ich es noch sagen muss" fällt mir spontan ein, "... wie lange wir hier schon warten", "... wie doof man sein kann" u.v.m. – user unknown Jul 1 '19 at 7:37
  • @infinitezero Ich habe Dir doch schon hunderttausendmal gesagt Du sollst nicht übertreiben! – Volker Landgraf Jul 4 '19 at 8:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.