2

Let me give some example sentences:

  1. There's a lot of strategy involved with tennis.

  2. There's too much politics involved with a promotion here.

  3. There's always some risk involved in an operation.

In some cases, it seems that "erfordert/erforderlich" works, but not all of the cases above. I do see on the internet a seemingly common way of expressing this, but I don't know if it's proper German, or correct. That is,

Bei X ist viel Y dabei.

Let me translate using this:

  1. Es ist beim Tennis viel Strategie dabei.

  2. Es ist bei einer Beförderung zu viel Politik dabei.

  3. Es ist immer bei einer Operation etwas Risiko dabei.

Would these be suitable translations?

  • Your excamples are not common German. They are are understandable but casual at best. Volker Landgraf's answer contains the phrases I would expect to be used in each case. – hajef Jul 12 '19 at 13:09
  • Sometimes X geht mit Y einher is suitable. – jonathan.scholbach Jul 12 '19 at 13:13
3

In general

An idiomatic translation would be

Da/Es steckt viel X in Y.

Or you could reverse the order and say

Zu Y gehört viel/eine Menge X.

For your concrete examples, I would say:

  1. Zum Tennis gehört eine Menge Strategie.
  2. Bei einer Beförderung ist zu viel Politik im Spiel.
  3. Eine Operation ist immer mit einem gewissen Risiko verbunden.
  • Thank you. Very nice suggestions. However, are there some limits to some of them? For example, I would not say, "Es steckt viel Risiko in einer Operation", oder? – Mark Jul 12 '19 at 13:13
  • That's right, it would sound strange (but would be understood nevertheless). I doubt that there is a rule that one could learn to know which wording is most suitable for which situation. Probably the only way is to talk to Germans or read texts written by Germans until you get a feeling for which is appropriate. And since this is about rather small nuances of style, different people might have different opinions about which one is the best. – Volker Landgraf Jul 12 '19 at 13:25
  • For instance, I think my suggestions are slightly better than the ones from TheAwfulLanguage, but I would not be surprised If (s)he considers his or her suggestions better than mine. – Volker Landgraf Jul 12 '19 at 13:25
1
  1. There's a lot of strategy involved with tennis.
  2. There's too much politics involved with a promotion here.
  3. There's always some risk involved in an operation.

Common translations are also:

  1. Tennis hat viel mit Strategie zu tun.
  2. Eine Beförderung ist hier mit zu viel Politik verbunden.
  3. Operation heißt immer auch Risiko.

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